I didn’t like it. Squee-harshing below.

For context, I entirely or mostly enjoyed both Captain America movies, The Avengers, and Iron Man I and III, and found both Thor movies and Iron Man II at least moderately amusing. So it’s not that I don’t like the franchise.

Spoilers! Squee-harshing! Tiny amount of squee regarding Jeremy Renner's biceps!

Things I Did Not Like

Every single action sequence. There was no wit or excitement or suspense or characterization in any of them, only stuff blowing up and then blowing up some more and then blowing up bigger.

Every single character who had their own movies didn’t jibe with their characterization in their own movies. Several of them additionally didn’t jibe with their characterization in Avengers either, which was quite a feat.

For example, I believe that Steve Rogers isn’t a potty-mouth. I don’t believe that he’s going to scold people for swearing. Tony Stark not only forgot everything he learned in his own movies, but also forgot everything he learned by the halfway point in this one.

Thor appeared to be visiting from a completely different movie, which he seemed understandably eager to return to.

Conceptually, Natasha/Bruce Banner is interesting. As portrayed, the actors had no chemistry and didn’t even seem to enjoy talking to each other. The ridiculous yenta-ing all the other characters were doing just underlined this. It was like the only way the audience would believe the relationship was if all the supporting characters kept insisting on it. Why create a relationship that requires that much insistence, rather than going with one that makes sense on its own?

“I’m a monster too” makes total sense if Natasha means her history as a brainwashed assassin. Slapping it on the end of a speech about being sterilized against her will makes it sound like being infertile makes you a monster. And while forced sterilization is bad, it’s also the only traditionally feminine bit of angst in her deliciously angsty backstory. She can’t be a monster because she was brainwashed and killed lots of people, oh no— that’s not gendered enough, apparently. In any case, that whole sequence was painful to watch. The actors looked like they were being forced to interact at gunpoint.

I did buy the Hawkeye/Hawkeye’s wife relationship, despite coming out of nowhere. The actors sold it, and they did have chemistry. It was convincing as the marriage between a military man who sees his wife and kids for about two weeks twice a year, and it sucks but they’re hanging in because they love each other. (Sucks to be them, though! Especially, sucks to be her. She seems to spend her entire life alone with her kids on a completely isolated farmhouse in the middle of nowhere. If she doesn't watch out, it'll be Yellow Wallpaper time.)

Here’s what I did not buy: that Hawkeye kept her and his kids secreted away on an isolated farm to keep them safe, and then when the team is being chased by over-powered baddies, he takes them to his helpless wife and kiddies, conveniently located so the enemy can follow his team, discover his wife and kids, swoop in the second he leaves, and kill them! Ultron didn’t actually do that, but he easily could have. Hawkeye seemed like a total idiot for not considering that as a very likely outcome.

I loved Bruce Banner in Avengers. I didn’t even like him in this.

Everyone sounded the same. You are not capturing character voices when every single character makes the same quips in the same way. This was most notable when Thor, Hawkeye, and a walk-on guy on the Helicarrier delivered virtually identical jokes on the theme of “I am supposed to be making a grand speech or important statement, but it's so stupid, I can’t even spit it out.” Actually, I think several other characters also made this joke, but I lost track.

On that note, I found exactly one quip funny. (It was the one about Tony creating a murderbot. The delivery was funny.) Otherwise, I did not like the dialogue at all. And normally I like Whedon’s dialogue! It was just so flat in this. It didn’t help that about 80% of the humor (and about 70% of the total dialogue) was meta-joking on the concept of “Gee, aren’t superhero movies stupid and implausible?” Well—this one certainly was!

Things I Did Like

Ultron’s first appearance. The swaying, partially assembled robot was genuinely creepy.

Vision. Everything leading up to Vision was stupid. Vision himself was cool.

Jeremy Renner. He had a comparatively consistent characterization and he sold the hell out of it, which was more than most of the cast managed. Also, Jeremy Renner’s biceps.

Hawkeye collapsing on a bench after the big finale. There was something real and human about that moment – a quality nearly entirely absent from the rest of the movie.

Wanda and Pietro, though I would have preferred something closer to their comic characterization and Wanda’s comic power.

Natasha shoving Bruce Banner into the pit.

The sculpture at the end credits.
Tags:
recessional: a small blue-paisley teapot with a blue mug (Default)

From: [personal profile] recessional



Here’s what I did not buy: that Hawkeye kept her and his kids secreted away on an isolated farm to keep them safe, and then when the team is being chased by over-powered baddies, he takes them to his helpless wife and kiddies, conveniently located so the enemy can follow his team, discover his wife and kids, swoop in the second he leaves, and kill them! Ultron didn’t actually do that, but he easily could have. Hawkeye seemed like a total idiot for not considering that as a very likely outcome


OH MY GOD THIS. (I mean, I go further and think that actually he's irresponsible as hell for doing this work at ALL while having such vulnerable attachments: GO HOME AND PARENT YOUR KIDS WHILE NOT MAKING INTERNATIONAL ASSASSIN ENEMIES, BARTON.) Like, I do not actually mind the married thing separate from that! But seriously.

I have moved past being Upset about this movie, but I am grumpy. (And I can always summon some seethe back up for the sterilization storyline because it's FUCKING AWFUL.)
kore: (Default)

From: [personal profile] kore


I think what makes the comparison to military life really weird to me is the military family is usually pretty safe on a US base, or a base overseas -- they're not expecting to be right in danger along with the soldier. But just as you said, taking the hunted fellow soldiers TO HIS HOUSE and then LEAVING his unprotected family, Jesus fucking Christ what? I mean, that was so we could have a Happy Family Life and so Bruce and Nat could moan about how they could Never Have One (wildly out of character for both of them). That was one of the points where the seams of moviemaking just seemed to show so awkwardly. We need Emotional Point B, so we need Setup A, to hell with whether Setup A makes any kind of sense or not.
sovay: (PJ Harvey: crow)

From: [personal profile] sovay


I was actually waiting for his family to be slaughtered! Normally I dislike that but it would have made so much sense that I was sort of disappointed that it didn't happen.

As the characters left the house and Hawkeye made some comment about his next home repair project, [livejournal.com profile] derspatchel mock-shouted into my ear, "And remind me to fix the fridge!"
kore: (Black Widow - Red Room movie poster)

From: [personal profile] kore


SNRK Can 'Tool Time with Clint' be far behind?
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

From: [personal profile] kate_nepveu


The fact that they didn't just underlines that their purpose was to establish the desirability/reward of heteronormativity.

From: [personal profile] torrilin


I'm not sure heteronormativity is the only thing going on here tho? It feels weird to me that given a US full of empty space often used for farming, Joss wound up sticking Clint and Laura in Iowa, same as Riley. An awful lot of the US is rural farmland. An awful lot. Why Iowa? There's farmland all over the damn place. MA. CA. VT. NH. PA. NY. So much farmland. It's like the guy has this weirdly detailed concept of what a "normal American" is and Iowa, farms, tractors, barns, corn, beef cattle, kids and heterosexual marriage are all required. (got news for you dude... most Americans do not live in Iowa) (and Clint's farm has no visible corn fields... just pasture and woods...) It's like he's got this archetype of "normal" in his head, and it just doesn't relate to much of anything real.
vom_marlowe: (Default)

From: [personal profile] vom_marlowe


I think it's more likely that Whedon has family or friends in Iowa or spent time there. Lots of writers will default back to specific places from their pasts. I'm not saying he's not being sloppy, but I suspect he's got a specific Iowa in mind.
kore: (Default)

From: [personal profile] kore


Actually, comics!Clint is from Waverly, Iowa (no idea why), which I remembered because my husband grew up in Iowa. So I thought it was a nod to continuity? But that's just my guess.

(People who actually LIVE in Iowa are often really annoyed by just the kind of small-minded pigeonholing you describe. "I'm from Iowa, we drive six hours for a basketball game!" drove my husband nuts. Not to mention FUCKING HAWKEYES, WHEDON) (also the fate of small farms in Iowa is not, uh, that idyllic anymore)
kore: (Black Widow - Red Room movie poster)

From: [personal profile] kore


I was completely spoiled for the movie, but even so I was expecting Clint's family to die and for Clint to die saving Pietro. Then Pietro dies and "um....that's sad for Wanda?"

Then I read this interview about how Joss said Pietro was this hedonistic "pussy hound" (no rly) whom Clint HATED (whut) and he died saving Clint and Clint was knocked over by it or something, and I was just like.....Joss, dude, the movie you thought you were making is not the movie you were making. Altho it does sound like Pussy Hound Pietro might be restored in the director's ut, which, um, hurrah? :-/
recessional: a small blue-paisley teapot with a blue mug (Default)

From: [personal profile] recessional


My thing (and it's mine, others' ma not have the same, but) is that it's not even CIA agent/civvie wife. Most CIA agents don't actually do super-dangerous shit, and even when they do they're cogs in a big machine: there's no profit in going after most of their families, especially not families who live in the US, because it doesn't GET the perpetrator much, because individual agents just are not that important. Because in the real world, that's how most large organizations work.

But in the real world I don't care how secretly powerful your eminence is grising, you're ALSO going to run into a SHITLOAD of trouble flying several gunships over to Malibu to bomb Tony Stark's house in a post-9/11 world.

That's not the world MCU has presented us: they've presented us with Killian being able to bomb Malibu without repercussions, SHIELD having helicarriers and super-spy-tech under the Potomac, etc, and they've presented us with Hawkeye as one of the rockstars of SHIELD's stable, with completely unique skills and connections that cannot be duplicated, as well as high profile missions etc etc.

Basically: a world where there's a LOT of profit in going after Agent Barton's family. In fact he's EXACTLY the level of SHIELD-agent whose collateral would be most likely to get damaged, because he's high up enough to know a LOT of secrets and a lot of people and a lot of skeletons in closets, while not being quite as high as Maria Hill or Fury himself, where there'd be protocol to deal with them being compromised (and enough eyes on them to make it almost impossible for it not to be known that they are).

Even if you just kill them, you've destabilized one of SHIELD's best assets, and sent a very powerful message to anyone who might be willing to work with SHIELD from the grey-legality world. So.
sovay: (Rotwang)

From: [personal profile] sovay


Did she tell her family she had to go into Witness Protection?

I genuinely liked Natasha not only knowing about Clint's family, but having a visibly affectionate, supportive relationship with them. You can hide from the world, but you cannot hide from curious Natasha.
kore: (Black Widow - Red Room movie poster)

From: [personal profile] kore


You can hide from the world, but you cannot hide from curious Natasha.

There's this awesome Natasha fic I quoted a while back where she says "I've stolen the world's best-kept secrets. Finding you would be child's play." It was a great line on SO MANY levels.
oyceter: teruterubouzu default icon (Default)

From: [personal profile] oyceter


I am still so annoyed that the movie didn't even try to go into why Tony was still making suits and robots after he destroyed them all in IM3, and how he powers the suit now that his Arc reactor had been removed. And Steve's characterization here retroactively makes me dislike some parts of Avengers because now I feel it's Joss completely not understanding Steve's character, as opposed to a few bad lines.

Natasha/Bruce is so awful and awkward! And I LIKED them as a ship after the first movie!

And finally, it was sad that even the action sequences were boring. Too many robots! Hulk vs. Iron Man uninteresting after the first minute! It especially sucks because I rewatched CA2 before seeing this, and the action sequences there are really good. Well, on the plus side, at least the CA2 directors are taking over the next Avengers movies.
londonkds: (Default)

From: [personal profile] londonkds


I personally believe that Tony and Pepper are both totally powered by debugged Extremis after IM III, because otherwise the films have a "you can overcome disability by pure willpower if you REALLY want to and aren't clinging to your disfunctionality" message that I find abhorrent.
sovay: (I Claudius)

From: [personal profile] sovay


I personally believe that Tony and Pepper are both totally powered by debugged Extremis after IM III

I thought that actually was what happened—like, I thought Pepper had superpowers now. Is that headcanon?
londonkds: (BLOOD AND TITTIES FOR LORD CHIBNALL!!! ()

From: [personal profile] londonkds


It happened but the message of the ending was "having superpowers is a crutch for the emotionally unstable which will eventually make you explode", so one implication is that she had the Extremis removed ASAP. My problem is with Tony having the arc reactor and the shrapnel surgically removed at the end, with no explanation of why he couldn't have done that at any point in the previous two films. Factually it works if you assume he used a stabilised form of Extremis on himself, but that seems to conflict with the moral the film appears to be trying to give.
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

From: [personal profile] kate_nepveu


Pepper's Extremis status, and Tony's, were deliberately left ambiguous by the end of IM3. I agree it seems likely he dosed himself with stabilized Extremis to allow the shrapnel removal, but that was obviously being left for future movies to establish definitively.
kore: (Default)

From: [personal profile] kore


Aww man, I'm not giving up superpowered Pepper. (Unless it's No You Had Superpowers All Along, Pep, which is a crappy plot but Pepper does have superpowers. I kind of love her.)
kore: (Default)

From: [personal profile] kore


And Steve's characterization here retroactively makes me dislike some parts of Avengers because now I feel it's Joss completely not understanding Steve's character, as opposed to a few bad lines.

Yeah, suddenly the lines for Steve in Avengers I disliked that everyone told me were "ironic" don't look so ironic anymore. Bah. WTF, Whedon? And it really did seem almost like he ignored every movie except his own previous one, which....ack.
sovay: (Psholtii: in a bad mood)

From: [personal profile] sovay


And it really did seem almost like he ignored every movie except his own previous one, which....ack.

His own previous movie got pretty sidelined, too.
sovay: (Rotwang)

From: [personal profile] sovay


How did he manage to write and direct Hulk/Banner so beautifully in Avengers, and so dreadfully in Ultron?

I keep coming back to the idea that ninety percent of the script's emotional development must be languishing in the deleted scenes, because it certainly wasn't on display in Age of Ultron. I kept seeing frustrating, fascinating fragments of relationships, but the only one that got any real time was Hawkeye's hitherto unknown family. I like the concept of Bruce/Natasha/Hulk. What's there in the text . . . needs work.

(I actually didn't have a ragequit reaction to the sterilization line; I didn't take it as a sincere expression of Natasha's own self-definition as a monster so much as a snap-out-of-it counter to Bruce's "I can never give you a normal life!" angst. I agree the scene was clunky as hell, though.)
vom_marlowe: (Default)

From: [personal profile] vom_marlowe


Oh man, the elevator fight is *so good*. Characterization wise, I don't think I've ever seen such a fine portrayal of both dominance (Steve as the others get on--he lets them get behind him, very calmly, and the line 'Before we get started, does anyone want to get off?'--that is pure fucking gorgeous apex alpha primate behavior) and Steve's own character--how he just refuses to compromise his ethics, how resourceful and out of the box he thinks, his excellent strategic mind when he leaps out the window! But my very favorite bit is his sad line, 'It kinda felt personal.'

That scene has plot, character, world-building, *everything* all wrapped up in just a few minutes. You couldn't swap a fight scene from another movie in for it without losing the whole thread. To me, that's what a fight scene should do--and Whedon has lost that knack. Unlike a lot of folks, I felt many of the Avengers fight scenes were too long or superfluous. But not in Winter Soldier. What I'd really love is to see an Avengers directed by Jon Favreau.
kore: (Default)

From: [personal profile] kore


ELEVATOR SCENE GROUPIES UNITE And the shield-stomp at the end! Steve <3

You'd love an already-famous hallway fight scene in the Daredevil series, too, it's full of characterization without anyone saying a word. And IIRC it's all one take.

From: [personal profile] torrilin


It's not so much the one take exactly for the DD scene. It's the one take and how the hell did you get the camera to do what needed to be done to get the take? I mean, I'm not great at videocamera work, but goddamn the camera operator needed some skill for that. Most of the DD fight scenes are an utter waste in my book (not all, but a truly depressing number), but the hallway scene is not one you can cut out of the script at all. And it took some very careful knowledge of what the camera crew could do to pull off the whole thing. And the special effects crew. There were a lot of very theatrical (in the sense of no, the effect has to be there right now as we perform) effects that had to happen very precisely too.

It seems to me like they're doing a pretty good job on the Spanish language chunks too, both in terms of script writing and performance. Gold star. I'm not good enough at any of the other languages on DD to judge them even a little. But trying on to get the Spanish right really helps.
kore: (Default)

From: [personal profile] kore


I have but one word to say in affirmation of all this and it is

AVOCADO
kore: (Black Widow - Red Room movie poster)

From: [personal profile] kore


Didn't it just SUCK? I went in expecting it to SUCK, and boy, it was even suckier than I expected. -- Did the very first action sequence look really off to you? It looked off to me and T but I was watching a shitty camrip on an older big TV, so I thought it was that. But then I heard people who saw it in the theatre saying it looked just....weird to them too, so I wondered.

Stuff I liked: The party scene (minus the stupid prima nocta joke). Nat being badass. I sat through IM2 basically for Nat's fight scenes, I sat through AoU for Nat's fight scenes too, I paid for neither movie, that feels fair.

What was wierd to me was how....badly made it felt. Most of the emotional connections were told about, not shown very well (oh yeah, Clint has a family! Here are these twins with their deep bond! Here's Sam and Rhodey for five minutes!), the plotting was whack even for a big popcorn action flick, everyone had smartmouth-disease....did you read the Sady Doyle piece on it? It was flawed but I thought she had some good points. When the original Avengers came out, there were no huge expectations for it, but the way it performed basically doomed the sequel and a lot of the movies after it.

Also everyone was all OMG REFUSED-TO-LAUNCH-THE-MISSILES GUY, and I sat there sourly thinking Refused-to-Launch-the-Missiles Guy will probably get a movie before Nat does.

WHERE IS THE BLACK WIDOW MOVIE
kore: (Default)

From: [personal profile] kore


The thing is, a bunch of other Marvel movies had the same formula, but they didn't suck!

Is it more that Joss melted down and couldn't handle something so big, then? Which is weird because he set it all up with the original Avengers....but maybe the expectations were just too huge.
vom_marlowe: (Default)

From: [personal profile] vom_marlowe


My theory is that Whedon has been heavily, HEAVILY rewarded for certain writing tics and that with Avengers 1, he hit 'rockstardom' of directors, without really having the internal skills. Joe Perry once talked about how come so many rockstars go from being awesome to shitty drug addled asshole. He says, 'Nobody tells you your shit stinks'. Which--when you're famous, when you're successful, who's going to risk their job to say, 'You know, buddy, these dailies kind of fucking suck.' Or, 'You're going to bring female sterility into the monster chat? Are you HIGH?' and so on.

Whedon isn't Spielberg. And yeah, Spielberg's had some clunkers, but he also has a TON more directing chops than Whedon.

If you look at how quippy Whedon's got, I think that can be directly traced to a ton of positive comments about funny quips. I should really finish my irritated essay and post it.
kore: (Default)

From: [personal profile] kore


Oh yes, I'd like to read that! I think the quipping really worked in the Buffy/Angel/Firefly era and less so as time went on.
recessional: a small blue-paisley teapot with a blue mug (Default)

From: [personal profile] recessional


Pretty much this. To me Joss Whedon has always had his strengths and weaknesses as a storyteller, and his journey as a storyteller has been increasingly to get lazy about his strengths (the quips, drama, etc) and to ignore the weaknesses, and it really, really starts to show.
stranger: Zhaan from Farscape (Zhaan)

From: [personal profile] stranger

apologies for dropping in after no comments for so long


I've just seen it for the second time, and yeah. It took me two viewings to follow the plot, although it also kind of took two viewings for me to get the first Avengers plot. Only one for Captain America, though, and about one and a half for Iron Man the first. Except that about halfway through IM the 1, Tony and his suit crashed into the desert and thereafter I considered that he was dead, because he had to be. The rest of the entire Marvel movies happen in some weird alternate reality where inertia isn't a physical force. Given Thor and Asgard, I suppose that could be a design feature. Or something.

But anyway, you make some good points about the characters being disappointingly by the numbers. It's Whedon's brand of by-the-numbers, which makes them about two cuts above the average action movie crew, but that's the problem. There could be a non-cardboard story in there, and it doesn't quite hang together.

One thing no one seems to have mentioned in any review I've seen is that the second half, after Ultron makes himself into a flying multitude and Vision has come forth to oppose him, is increasingly a series of visual references to (Christian, medieval) religious art. It's full of hovering armies of demons, centered explicitly on a church. I can just about recognize the pictures, and it can't be accidental, but how this fits into a universe with Asgardians, Tony Stark's death-defying ego, and literally miraculous mutants, I really can't see as yet.
sovay: (Rotwang)

From: [personal profile] sovay


Natasha shoving Bruce Banner into the pit.

That was the most in-character thing she did in the entire movie as far as I'm concerned. It was great.

I walked out of Age of Ultron having enjoyed it, but feeling very strongly that Whedon had run up against the limits of his ability to differentiate characters by voice and the structure, whatever it was, didn't work. I may have rewatched The Avengers for comparison and incidentally to make myself feel better about most of the characters.

From: [identity profile] selenite.livejournal.com


"But I need the other guy." Shove. Yep, that was great.

I'm looking forward to seeing the deleted scenes on the DVD more than I am to seeing the movie again. I'm hoping that's where all the missing connective tissue wound up.
sovay: (Rotwang)

From: [personal profile] sovay


I'm looking forward to seeing the deleted scenes on the DVD more than I am to seeing the movie again. I'm hoping that's where all the missing connective tissue wound up.

Agreed.

From: [identity profile] egelantier.livejournal.com


yuuuuuup. lots of noise, total unwillingness to commit to anything emotional on any substantive level, and habitual whedon inability to follow up on what he set up. so, all in one, pretty much what i expected from a2. NOW GIVE ME THE GOTG SEQUEL.

From: [identity profile] exiled-mind.livejournal.com


I found your post from the LJ homepage, so I realize I am a total stranger and my comment will be coming out of nowhere, but I wanted to say that I really enjoyed reading about your reactions and that you helped me to better understand some of my own reactions to the movie. I had fun watching and would absolutely see it again, but I was left somewhat unsettled (that might not be the correct word for the situation) by it in many ways but have been having trouble pointing to some of the specific things that didn't really work for me. Your words definitely resonate with my reactions.

From: [identity profile] rachelmanija.livejournal.com


Oh, no, random people comment here all the time. It's totally fine.

From: [identity profile] cat-i-th-adage.livejournal.com


I liked the way Natasha zoomed around with motorbikes and muscle cars and had an unshakable partnership with someone who she was in no way sexually interested in (and vice versa). And they took turns doing the driving, too. (Um, I am easily entertained?)

I figured her "I'm a monster" line was showing solidarity with Bruce about the killer thing, and he was the one who brought up sterility first. It's interesting to look at those two as foils. He's got approximately zero agency in this movie - called out by other people when they deem a Code Green necessary and then put away, pressured by his friend into doing something he thinks is profoundly unwise and caving to that, all the shame and responsibility he inherited from the Hulk's freak-out in Africa. Natasha's back story is all about how she was a tool in someone else's toolbox, called out to do a job, burdened with the shame and responsibility of what her hands have done. And now she's doing okay - she's got friends, and she makes her own choices (she turned her back on, what, a senate committee? in Captain America 2), she's a loved Honorary Auntie in her best friend's family. It's like she's five or ten years ahead on the road Bruce is walking, saying things can get better. Or maybe I'm reading too much into that. But that's my headcanon.

I liked Hawkeye talking Wanda out of a panic attack, and telling her that it was okay to be afraid. And all of his humanity throughout the movie. "The city is flying, and I have a bow." (I like Jeremy Renner's voice a lot.)

I liked those long panning shots they put in at the start and the end, where the camera moved smoothly from one Avenger to another, working together. It felt a lot like a splash page from the comics.

And, oddly enough, I liked that so much of the trouble was caused by Tony Stark Having Issues, because some issues just don't go away all at once.

**

If I remember correctly, the original comics introduction of Cap to the Avengers happened when they were tooling around the Arctic in their submarine, as you do, found him encased in ice (I think he was being worshipped as an idol by somebody?), defrost him, and offer him a ride back to New York. When they get to the city, most of them debark first and get frozen by some villain's freeze ray, so when the Captain comes up he... assumes that the brightly coloured bodies are actually statues erected in their honour and that they've left him behind, and wanders alone into the city. It's been awhile since I read that. I could well have gotten that part wrong. But nothing, nothing in the movies could possibly be stupider than early Marvel plots.

From: [identity profile] cat-i-th-adage.livejournal.com


There's a short fanfic that speculates that Cap, an old soldier, was by nature the most potty-mouthed of the team, and Had Been Ordered to keep things nice and vanilla by people concerned with PR. He swore about it, a lot.

May the next Guardians of the Galaxy be as entertaining as the first.

From: [identity profile] cat-i-th-adage.livejournal.com


Hang on - didn't mean to sound like I was harshing your squee-harshing. You make some good points.

Just talking about the bits I liked.

From: [identity profile] poilass.livejournal.com


Yeah, I hated it. I went in expecting it to be a mess, but I didn't expect it to be *boring*. It was so boring!! I think I laughed a total of twice (please be a secret door, yay!, & "Gout").

The actress for Laura-no-last-name-but-it-can't-be-Barton did a pretty great job with the absolutely nothing she was given. I started trying to come up with backstories for why she lives in the middle of nowhere but I don't want to get attached as she's probably destined to be fridged in the next movie.

But the thing that made me the most angry about this terrible film was actually the end scene with the new team, because I don't believe for a minute that we will actually get a film about that team.

I am glad I never have to see it again, basically.

From: [identity profile] yhlee.livejournal.com


Didn't hate it, but by the time I went to see it, I had already-low expectations lowered even further by what I'd been hearing from people who'd seen it first. I don't really disagree with anything you bring up here.
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