Sherwood and I posted on disability in the Change series at Diversity in YA.

Everything I write stems from personal experience, even if it’s set in a post-apocalyptic world where people have mutant powers and the trees can eat you.
vladdraculea: (Default)

From: [personal profile] vladdraculea


Yay, it looks like one of your books made it to Audible, so I'm getting it!

By the way, responding to something said in the blog post itself, I'm happier being described as “Disabled” than as “a person with a disability”, since disability — at least in this incarnation — is as much a part of my identity as being Jewish or a lover of silk fabric or as being Ace (asexual). But either way is okay, though in my case the disabilities are plural.
vladdraculea: (Default)

From: [personal profile] vladdraculea


Yeah. I'm Autistic, but I *have albinism*, and so do most of the people I know in the albinism community. For some reason, most of us have no trouble with saying we're “Blind”, but the albinism part — even though it's one of the first things most people notice about us when they see us — usually isn't part of our identity in the same way. That said, I and others in that community sometimes use the hashtag #AlbinoPride since it takes up way less characters on Twitter.

From: [identity profile] jennifergale.livejournal.com


That made me laugh! Oh, how that resonates! What's fun is when it stems from personal experience and you don't even realize it until later. (Hmm...fun or creepy?)

From: [identity profile] jennifergale.livejournal.com


A while after escaping a magnificently special marriage, I returned to the manuscript I drafted during that period and was horrified. The first few pages were downright prophetic. My writer-brain saw what my human brain had no desire to notice. I thought I was writing a doting character who later turned out to be a monster. Instead, he was a monster from the first sentence. What had shifted was that I knew what those markers meant.

I'm not sure. Does this mean that we are smarter than we know when we do this...or more clueless than we ought to be? (Or something else entirely!?)

From: [identity profile] rachelmanija.livejournal.com


It's like a photograph taken that reveals detail that are only relevant in retrospect. Sometimes we see clearly, but don't understand what we see until we get context later.
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