Thousand Voices, One Fight. From Janelle Monae’s “Metropolis Suite,” but basically accessible to anyone. (It’s the future, androids are slaves.) Almost a long prose-poem on revolution, oppression, and song.

Do you know what power is? Power is buying the one you admire. Power is a million soldiers' footsteps moving to the beat of your desire. Power is binary wine in brilliant cups. Power is a lie.

Coming Down the Chain, from P. C. Hodgell’s Kencyrath series. Someone got the “Make Jame a singer in a band” prompt and actually made it a serious, in-universe (more or less) story. Full of Hodgell’s doomy atmosphere and deadpan humor.

Turning Points. Posy, Pauline, and Petrova of Noel Streatfeild’s Ballet Shoes are now adults, facing new challenges and making new vows.

Tactical Dispositions. From the movie Red Cliff, but also using some book canon. Another duet marks the beginning of the end of the friendship between Zhuge Liang and Zhou Yu. Twisty, convincing politics, lovely atmosphere, and looming heartbreak over it it all.

Witch. From L. J. Smith’s Night World No. 1: Secret Vampire; Daughters of Darkness; Spellbinder series, accessible if you’ve read the first book. Phil (Poppy the vampire’s twin brother) is stuck in a safe house full of witches, vampires, and other very special people; funny, sharp, and compelling.

Other Dances. A quietly beautiful, moving story set after Tehanu. Even girls who are dragons are still girls, and wizards and former priestesses have nothing more, and nothing less to offer than tea and cloth, and human comfort and wisdom.

Unbinding. Also Earthsea, a brief but intense flashfic.
Thousand Voices, One Fight. From Janelle Monae’s “Metropolis Suite,” but basically accessible to anyone. (It’s the future, androids are slaves.) Almost a long prose-poem on revolution, oppression, and song.

Do you know what power is? Power is buying the one you admire. Power is a million soldiers' footsteps moving to the beat of your desire. Power is binary wine in brilliant cups. Power is a lie.

Coming Down the Chain, from P. C. Hodgell’s Kencyrath series. Someone got the “Make Jame a singer in a band” prompt and actually made it a serious, in-universe (more or less) story. Full of Hodgell’s doomy atmosphere and deadpan humor.

Turning Points. Posy, Pauline, and Petrova of Noel Streatfeild’s Ballet Shoes are now adults, facing new challenges and making new vows.

Tactical Dispositions. From the movie Red Cliff, but also using some book canon. Another duet marks the beginning of the end of the friendship between Zhuge Liang and Zhou Yu. Twisty, convincing politics, lovely atmosphere, and looming heartbreak over it it all.

Witch. From L. J. Smith’s Night World No. 1: Secret Vampire; Daughters of Darkness; Spellbinder series, accessible if you’ve read the first book. Phil (Poppy the vampire’s twin brother) is stuck in a safe house full of witches, vampires, and other very special people; funny, sharp, and compelling.

Other Dances. A quietly beautiful, moving story set after Tehanu. Even girls who are dragons are still girls, and wizards and former priestesses have nothing more, and nothing less to offer than tea and cloth, and human comfort and wisdom.

Unbinding. Also Earthsea, a brief but intense flashfic.
Unlike many others in my high school, I didn’t read Flowers in the Attic (Dollanganger) then. It had a black cover with scary zombie children, and I was under the impression that it was horror about vampires. Much later I learned that it was actually about incestuous children in an attic. I have now read it, and believe that I have discovered the source of fandom’s incest obsession, at least that incest-happy section of fandom which is American and read the book in their formative years.

This is a great book to read on a plane, especially when you can poke your seatmate and read bits aloud. In the first chapter, titled “Goodbye, Daddy,” a highway patrolman comes to the house of the lovely Momma and her four children, Chris, Cathy, Carrie, and Cory. His explanation of what happened is a typical example of how Andrews fulfills expectations (Dad was squashed on the highway) and then takes them not just one, but at least two steps further into feverish melodrama than one expects:

”According to the accounts, which we’ve recorded, there was a motorist driving a blue Ford weaving in and out of the lefthand lane, apparently drunk, and he crashed head-on into your husband’s car. But it seems your husband must have seen the accident coming, for he swerved to avoid a head-on collision, but a piece of machinery had fallen from another car, or truck, and this kept him from completing his defensive driving maneuver, which would have saved his life. But as it was, your husband’s much heavier car turned over several times, and still he might have survived, but an oncoming truck, unable to stop, crashed into his car, and again the Cadillac spun over… and then… it caught on fire.”

As if those THREE accidents weren’t enough, the cop then produces the charred stuffed animals Daddy had purchased for his kids, which he had been driving home to deliver but which ended up strewn across the highway of death!

Momma then whisks her kids away to the ominous house of her parents, who hate her. I had thought the mention, early on, that Momma and Daddy looked like brother and sister was foreshadowing for the upcoming incest. No! It was foreshadowing for the revelation that Momma and Daddy were, in fact, related. He was her half-uncle! So her mother hates her and her incestuous spawn, and Momma and grandmother lock all four kids in the attic until Momma can find the right moment to tell her ailing father about them. Or for the aging father to will her tons of money and die.

Three years of increasingly melodramatic child abuse in the attic ensues. The grandmother spots Chris seeing Cathy naked and tries to hack off her hair. Then she sneaks in, injects Cathy with a sedative, and pours tar over her head. Chris pees into the bathtub to de-tar Cathy’s hair, and it comes out silver and more beautiful than ever. Grandmother doesn’t feed them for a week, and Chris cuts his wrist with a penknife and feeds the others on his own blood!

Momma re-marries and STILL doesn’t let them out of the attic. Chris and Cathy angst and lust over each other. Cathy sneaks out and beholds Momma’s bed, which is shaped like a swan.

And then came the most melodramatic twist yet!

Read more... )
Unlike many others in my high school, I didn’t read Flowers in the Attic (Dollanganger) then. It had a black cover with scary zombie children, and I was under the impression that it was horror about vampires. Much later I learned that it was actually about incestuous children in an attic. I have now read it, and believe that I have discovered the source of fandom’s incest obsession, at least that incest-happy section of fandom which is American and read the book in their formative years.

This is a great book to read on a plane, especially when you can poke your seatmate and read bits aloud. In the first chapter, titled “Goodbye, Daddy,” a highway patrolman comes to the house of the lovely Momma and her four children, Chris, Cathy, Carrie, and Cory. His explanation of what happened is a typical example of how Andrews fulfills expectations (Dad was squashed on the highway) and then takes them not just one, but at least two steps further into feverish melodrama than one expects:

”According to the accounts, which we’ve recorded, there was a motorist driving a blue Ford weaving in and out of the lefthand lane, apparently drunk, and he crashed head-on into your husband’s car. But it seems your husband must have seen the accident coming, for he swerved to avoid a head-on collision, but a piece of machinery had fallen from another car, or truck, and this kept him from completing his defensive driving maneuver, which would have saved his life. But as it was, your husband’s much heavier car turned over several times, and still he might have survived, but an oncoming truck, unable to stop, crashed into his car, and again the Cadillac spun over… and then… it caught on fire.”

As if those THREE accidents weren’t enough, the cop then produces the charred stuffed animals Daddy had purchased for his kids, which he had been driving home to deliver but which ended up strewn across the highway of death!

Momma then whisks her kids away to the ominous house of her parents, who hate her. I had thought the mention, early on, that Momma and Daddy looked like brother and sister was foreshadowing for the upcoming incest. No! It was foreshadowing for the revelation that Momma and Daddy were, in fact, related. He was her half-uncle! So her mother hates her and her incestuous spawn, and Momma and grandmother lock all four kids in the attic until Momma can find the right moment to tell her ailing father about them. Or for the aging father to will her tons of money and die.

Three years of increasingly melodramatic child abuse in the attic ensues. The grandmother spots Chris seeing Cathy naked and tries to hack off her hair. Then she sneaks in, injects Cathy with a sedative, and pours tar over her head. Chris pees into the bathtub to de-tar Cathy’s hair, and it comes out silver and more beautiful than ever. Grandmother doesn’t feed them for a week, and Chris cuts his wrist with a penknife and feeds the others on his own blood!

Momma re-marries and STILL doesn’t let them out of the attic. Chris and Cathy angst and lust over each other. Cathy sneaks out and beholds Momma’s bed, which is shaped like a swan.

And then came the most melodramatic twist yet!

Read more... )
rachelmanija: (Autumn: small leaves)
( Dec. 29th, 2009 05:44 pm)
Anyone figured out which stories I wrote? Guess away! (No reveal till The Reveal.) I have four in Yuletide and one in Madness.
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rachelmanija: (Autumn: small leaves)
( Dec. 29th, 2009 05:44 pm)
Anyone figured out which stories I wrote? Guess away! (No reveal till The Reveal.) I have four in Yuletide and one in Madness.
Tags:
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