Will You Bloom Bright And Fierce was a Yuletide Treat for [livejournal.com profile] teaotter, who wrote the fabulous Steerswoman story Dumb Animals last year.

It's based on the gorgeous Dave Carter and Tracy Grammar song The Disappearing Man. The story itself requires no familiarity with the song or anything else. Rated R for brief but somewhat explicit sex.

I loved her prompt, which I saw and coveted before assignments went in. In particular, I liked her suggestion that it was a myth about the change of seasons.

Obviously this is not my usual writing style! The song is in second person, and I started the story that way as an experiment, but liked the way it read so I kept it. I wanted a style that wasn't similar to that of the song, but also wasn't ordinary prose, to preserve a somewhat surreal, dreamlike, heightened flavor.

The song has almost no clues in terms of setting. Going by the lyrics alone, the overall feel seems European-mythic, though "canyon" suggests America to me. But I'm a huge fan of Carter and Grammer, and their work overall is very, very American. So I decided to have a mythic story enacted in a real location, small-town USA with burgers and fries and bears in the woods outside of town. Since I prefer, whenever using real locations, to use ones I know, it's set in rural California near Yosemite - maybe Coarsegold, maybe Mariposa, maybe one of the other little towns nearby. The plants I mention all really grow there, and there really are bears and cougars (and meth labs) in the woods.

This post (http://heron61.livejournal.com/654149.html) commented that the story is very feminist, and received this comment, which cracked me up: "What I notice about that fanfiction story is that the author is extremely unusually familiar with Southern California native wildflowers."

I'm not particularly, but am familiar enough (my parents have a house in Mariposa) that I was able to fill in the rest with research.
Will You Bloom Bright And Fierce was a Yuletide Treat for [livejournal.com profile] teaotter, who wrote the fabulous Steerswoman story Dumb Animals last year.

It's based on the gorgeous Dave Carter and Tracy Grammar song The Disappearing Man. The story itself requires no familiarity with the song or anything else. Rated R for brief but somewhat explicit sex.

I loved her prompt, which I saw and coveted before assignments went in. In particular, I liked her suggestion that it was a myth about the change of seasons.

Obviously this is not my usual writing style! The song is in second person, and I started the story that way as an experiment, but liked the way it read so I kept it. I wanted a style that wasn't similar to that of the song, but also wasn't ordinary prose, to preserve a somewhat surreal, dreamlike, heightened flavor.

The song has almost no clues in terms of setting. Going by the lyrics alone, the overall feel seems European-mythic, though "canyon" suggests America to me. But I'm a huge fan of Carter and Grammer, and their work overall is very, very American. So I decided to have a mythic story enacted in a real location, small-town USA with burgers and fries and bears in the woods outside of town. Since I prefer, whenever using real locations, to use ones I know, it's set in rural California near Yosemite - maybe Coarsegold, maybe Mariposa, maybe one of the other little towns nearby. The plants I mention all really grow there, and there really are bears and cougars (and meth labs) in the woods.

This post (http://heron61.livejournal.com/654149.html) commented that the story is very feminist, and received this comment, which cracked me up: "What I notice about that fanfiction story is that the author is extremely unusually familiar with Southern California native wildflowers."

I'm not particularly, but am familiar enough (my parents have a house in Mariposa) that I was able to fill in the rest with research.
rachelmanija: (Autumn: small leaves)
( Jan. 2nd, 2010 12:22 am)
I wrote a lot this year: four full-length stories (one the single longest short piece I've ever written) and one short Madness story. I will post longer notes on individual stories later. I hope some of you do the same, as I always enjoy reading them.

My Yuletide assignment, for Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern novels, was The Ballad of Mirrim and Menolly's Ride, for [livejournal.com profile] calenlily. Rated PG for non-graphic violence; gen.

Menolly, Mirrim, and Mirrim's dragon Path travel through times that were, will be, and might have been to warn Pern of a deadly new threat. Long but hopefully worth it. If you vaguely recall the premise of the books (humans ride telepathic dragons to fight caustic Thread) you should be good to go.

The Marvels We Have Seen, from Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern, was a Treat for [livejournal.com profile] boosette, who wrote the lovely Menolly-centric Lend Song a Sweeter Grace last year.

A fire lizard mating flight brings Mirrim and Menolly closer together in more ways than one. Rated R for moderately explicit sex. It works as a prequel to my gen Mirrim and Menolly story, if you care to take it that way.

Will You Bloom Bright And Fierce was a Yuletide Treat for [livejournal.com profile] teaotter, who wrote the fabulous Steerswoman story Dumb Animals last year.

It's based on the gorgeous Dave Carter and Tracy Grammar song The Disappearing Man. The story itself requires no familiarity with the song or anything else. Rated R for brief but somewhat explicit sex.

Thistledown. From Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea series, accessible if you've read the first book. For Doire, who requested something about Vetch, one of my favorite characters. Rated G.

It was inspired by my thoughts on Le Guin's thoughts on heroism (traditionally male) and domesticity (traditionally female). She seems to value the latter more highly and also tries to reclaim the designated-feminine spheres as heroic in their own right, which is valid but which can make it seem like men have all the fun. This was my attempt to reconcile the two in a way which fits both her first trilogy and the later books.

The deeds of women are not often written into songs.

Color All Days Blue, But Save One For Many Colors. For Shannon C, who requested a cracky crossover with V. C. Andrews' Flowers in the Attic. I hastily checked her blog and found that she had read Nalini Singh's cracktastic Psy-Changeling series, in which Psys are psychics, Changelings are shapeshifters, and extra-powerful Psys have eyes like the night sky and the stars become fireworks during orgasm. Rated R for underage incest. I know, I know...

Momma explained that we were the forbidden children of an incestuous Psy-Changeling marriage and that she, a powerful Cardinal Psy, had fled PsyNet to marry her half-Changeling, half-Psy, half-uncle.

I blame Oyce for both the "half-uncle" line and the phrase "the dark blot of our existence."
rachelmanija: (Autumn: small leaves)
( Jan. 2nd, 2010 12:22 am)
I wrote a lot this year: four full-length stories (one the single longest short piece I've ever written) and one short Madness story. I will post longer notes on individual stories later. I hope some of you do the same, as I always enjoy reading them.

My Yuletide assignment, for Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern novels, was The Ballad of Mirrim and Menolly's Ride, for [livejournal.com profile] calenlily. Rated PG for non-graphic violence; gen.

Menolly, Mirrim, and Mirrim's dragon Path travel through times that were, will be, and might have been to warn Pern of a deadly new threat. Long but hopefully worth it. If you vaguely recall the premise of the books (humans ride telepathic dragons to fight caustic Thread) you should be good to go.

The Marvels We Have Seen, from Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern, was a Treat for [livejournal.com profile] boosette, who wrote the lovely Menolly-centric Lend Song a Sweeter Grace last year.

A fire lizard mating flight brings Mirrim and Menolly closer together in more ways than one. Rated R for moderately explicit sex. It works as a prequel to my gen Mirrim and Menolly story, if you care to take it that way.

Will You Bloom Bright And Fierce was a Yuletide Treat for [livejournal.com profile] teaotter, who wrote the fabulous Steerswoman story Dumb Animals last year.

It's based on the gorgeous Dave Carter and Tracy Grammar song The Disappearing Man. The story itself requires no familiarity with the song or anything else. Rated R for brief but somewhat explicit sex.

Thistledown. From Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea series, accessible if you've read the first book. For Doire, who requested something about Vetch, one of my favorite characters. Rated G.

It was inspired by my thoughts on Le Guin's thoughts on heroism (traditionally male) and domesticity (traditionally female). She seems to value the latter more highly and also tries to reclaim the designated-feminine spheres as heroic in their own right, which is valid but which can make it seem like men have all the fun. This was my attempt to reconcile the two in a way which fits both her first trilogy and the later books.

The deeds of women are not often written into songs.

Color All Days Blue, But Save One For Many Colors. For Shannon C, who requested a cracky crossover with V. C. Andrews' Flowers in the Attic. I hastily checked her blog and found that she had read Nalini Singh's cracktastic Psy-Changeling series, in which Psys are psychics, Changelings are shapeshifters, and extra-powerful Psys have eyes like the night sky and the stars become fireworks during orgasm. Rated R for underage incest. I know, I know...

Momma explained that we were the forbidden children of an incestuous Psy-Changeling marriage and that she, a powerful Cardinal Psy, had fled PsyNet to marry her half-Changeling, half-Psy, half-uncle.

I blame Oyce for both the "half-uncle" line and the phrase "the dark blot of our existence."
The Marvels We Have Seen, from Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern, was a Treat for [livejournal.com profile] boosette, who wrote the lovely Menolly-centric Lend Song a Sweeter Grace last year.

A fire lizard mating flight brings Mirrim and Menolly closer together in more ways than one. Rated R for moderately explicit sex.

If you want to read this but are unfamiliar with the books, click on the cut tag at the bottom of the post for background info. Note that this is only the info you need for this story, and the notes on my other story have more extensive info that's necessary for the other one.

This is the first time I've ever written two stories in the same fandom for Yuletide. After failing to snag [livejournal.com profile] boosette's appealing pinch hit request, I wrote it anyway as a Treat.

This story got all the sex and politics I didn't think my other recipient would like. It could be a prequel to my other Pern story, assuming that the political changes mentioned at the end would take more than a year to materialize. The title is from one of the songs quoted in Dragonsinger.

Vague spoilers of a sexual nature )

Background info on Pern )
The Marvels We Have Seen, from Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern, was a Treat for [livejournal.com profile] boosette, who wrote the lovely Menolly-centric Lend Song a Sweeter Grace last year.

A fire lizard mating flight brings Mirrim and Menolly closer together in more ways than one. Rated R for moderately explicit sex.

If you want to read this but are unfamiliar with the books, click on the cut tag at the bottom of the post for background info. Note that this is only the info you need for this story, and the notes on my other story have more extensive info that's necessary for the other one.

This is the first time I've ever written two stories in the same fandom for Yuletide. After failing to snag [livejournal.com profile] boosette's appealing pinch hit request, I wrote it anyway as a Treat.

This story got all the sex and politics I didn't think my other recipient would like. It could be a prequel to my other Pern story, assuming that the political changes mentioned at the end would take more than a year to materialize. The title is from one of the songs quoted in Dragonsinger.

Vague spoilers of a sexual nature )

Background info on Pern )
My Yuletide assignment, for Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern novels, was The Ballad of Mirrim and Menolly's Ride, for [livejournal.com profile] calenlily. Rated PG for non-graphic violence; gen.

Menolly, Mirrim, and Mirrim's dragon Path travel through times that were, will be, and might have been to warn Pern of a deadly new threat.

If you're not familiar with Anne McCaffrey's Pern books but want to read this anyway (I'm flattered if that's the case), click on the link below for background information. If you are familiar with the books but haven't re-read them in ages, I incorporated reminders of the necessary background into the story, so you should be good to go. (The story ignores all canon written after Dragondrums.)

This is the first time I've ever written my own request for Yuletide. I don't mean that I ignored my recipient's notes, but that I incorporated them into a story which also fulfills one of my requests. Duels, female friendship, female heroism, dragon companions, alternate universes, the bittersweet knowledge of paths not taken, and having the world recognize your awesomeness exactly as you are, flaws and all: this epic gen adventure is the creature from Rachel's id.

Background info on Pern )

I only offered Mirrim and Menolly, but was matched on "any" with a recipient who had requested Pern twice, once for "any" and once for her OTP, Lessa and F'lar. Luckily, poking through my recipient's LJ revealed that she did like both Mirrim and Menolly, though sadly she requested no non-canonical relationships so there could be no femmeslash. On the other hand, I'm not sure when they would have had time to have sex in my story anyway.

Here's her Yuletide letter. Note how I did manage a variant on her suggestion of "Weyrleaders through the ages."

This story was enormously assisted by [livejournal.com profile] yhlee, by brainstorming, beta, and the invaluable loan of The Atlas of Pern. She also terrorized me by informing me, quite correctly, that my story (then clocking in at 13,000 words) was rushed and too short. After agonizing, I made it longer. At 18,000 words, this is the longest short piece I've ever written in my life.

By the way, Pern has the most inconsistent canon of anything I've ever written. Characters' names are spelled differently in different books. Object names are spelled differently. Dueling between dragonriders is a) absolutely forbidden, b) something dragonriders are specifically trained to do, c) met with general approval, d) causes a summit meeting. The apparent ages of characters are inconsistent with the timeline, which itself is confusing due to time travel.

Incidentally, I ended up writing a Treat story, "The Marvels We Have Seen," for a different recipient which could conceivably work as a prequel. Don't read the Treat unless you're OK with the idea that Mirrim and Menolly's friendship occasionally involves sex.

Here be enormous spoilers for my story, and also dragons. Read the story first. )
My Yuletide assignment, for Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern novels, was The Ballad of Mirrim and Menolly's Ride, for [livejournal.com profile] calenlily. Rated PG for non-graphic violence; gen.

Menolly, Mirrim, and Mirrim's dragon Path travel through times that were, will be, and might have been to warn Pern of a deadly new threat.

If you're not familiar with Anne McCaffrey's Pern books but want to read this anyway (I'm flattered if that's the case), click on the link below for background information. If you are familiar with the books but haven't re-read them in ages, I incorporated reminders of the necessary background into the story, so you should be good to go. (The story ignores all canon written after Dragondrums.)

This is the first time I've ever written my own request for Yuletide. I don't mean that I ignored my recipient's notes, but that I incorporated them into a story which also fulfills one of my requests. Duels, female friendship, female heroism, dragon companions, alternate universes, the bittersweet knowledge of paths not taken, and having the world recognize your awesomeness exactly as you are, flaws and all: this epic gen adventure is the creature from Rachel's id.

Background info on Pern )

I only offered Mirrim and Menolly, but was matched on "any" with a recipient who had requested Pern twice, once for "any" and once for her OTP, Lessa and F'lar. Luckily, poking through my recipient's LJ revealed that she did like both Mirrim and Menolly, though sadly she requested no non-canonical relationships so there could be no femmeslash. On the other hand, I'm not sure when they would have had time to have sex in my story anyway.

Here's her Yuletide letter. Note how I did manage a variant on her suggestion of "Weyrleaders through the ages."

This story was enormously assisted by [livejournal.com profile] yhlee, by brainstorming, beta, and the invaluable loan of The Atlas of Pern. She also terrorized me by informing me, quite correctly, that my story (then clocking in at 13,000 words) was rushed and too short. After agonizing, I made it longer. At 18,000 words, this is the longest short piece I've ever written in my life.

By the way, Pern has the most inconsistent canon of anything I've ever written. Characters' names are spelled differently in different books. Object names are spelled differently. Dueling between dragonriders is a) absolutely forbidden, b) something dragonriders are specifically trained to do, c) met with general approval, d) causes a summit meeting. The apparent ages of characters are inconsistent with the timeline, which itself is confusing due to time travel.

Incidentally, I ended up writing a Treat story, "The Marvels We Have Seen," for a different recipient which could conceivably work as a prequel. Don't read the Treat unless you're OK with the idea that Mirrim and Menolly's friendship occasionally involves sex.

Here be enormous spoilers for my story, and also dragons. Read the story first. )
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