I am trying to beat a path through my unread books, which have gotten really out of hand. As in, I have no room for new books. I am setting myself a challenge: to periodically pick up unread books, especially ones on overcrowded shelves that I don’t even know why I own the book in the first place, and read one chapter. On the basis of that, it either goes back on the shelf or to Goodwill. (Or— likely frequent outcome— I finish reading the book on the spot.)

Obviously, these notes are not remotely full reviews, but are merely for entertainment purposes. Feel free to tell me if you think I’m about to discard something I’d enjoy if I persevered.

Voices After Midnight, by Richard Peck. Author was famous in the ‘80s, but I never got into him. Two kids from 1988 time-travel to 1888. I know this because of the back of the book, but the first chapter-and-a-half didn’t get to it. Extremely, extremely dated, packed full of references that were new and hip in 1988. Also, dullsville. Discard.

Sign of the Raven, by Julie Hearn. Another time travel children’s book, this one to the early seventeenth century, which also didn’t get to the time travel by the time I gave up. First chapter consists of a mom with cancer, lots of descriptions of a mysterious stench, and a protagonist I really didn’t like. Likely to be depressing and full of grossness. Discard.

Helen and Troy’s Epic Road Quest, by A. Lee Martinez. A minotaur girl in a Percy Jackson-esque world. The first page was funny enough to grab me, plus one rarely sees a female minotaur. Keep.

Anxiety and its Treatment, by Griest, Jefferson, and Marks. An intro to anxiety for people who’ve just been diagnosed with it, not a treatment manual, as I thought when I nabbed it from library discards. Too old and dated to be useful. Discard.

A Night Without Stars, by James Howe. This grabbed me enough to finish it, though I’m not sure I’d re-read. Italian-American, 11-year-old Maria has to have an operation for a hole in her heart. She’s scared and no one explains things to her clearly. At the hospital, she meets Donald, a boy her age with severe burns, whom the other hospitalized kids mock and ostracize. Donald and Maria bond over admitting their fear and being honest. Dated in many ways, which is too bad since it was obviously written in part for children who are facing surgery and probably wouldn’t be given to them now due to the datedness, but emotionally honest and sweet.
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