I tachiyomi'd this, so I nothing to refer back to. However, I don't think that would have made much of a difference.

This wins the prize as the single most incoherent manga I have ever read, even beating The World Exists For Me. And volume three may have been the least comprehensible volume of the bunch. Not only could I not follow the story in general, I usually couldn't tell what was happening on any given page. (I read the whole thing out of sheer amazement.)

Upon consulting [livejournal.com profile] oyceter, I discovered that part of my confusion was caused by two misapprehensions. I had thought that there was only one long-haired man with an eye-patch. There are two. Also, I thought that Tokage had vanished from the story and some random guy named Isaiah had appeared. What actually happens is that Tokage turns out to be named Isaiah.

There is a dead fairy God on an oxygen mask, a door into Faerie, and people crawling in and out of other people's bodies. Ian gets full-sized wings, or maybe that's an illusion. Faerie and Earth merge, unless that's an illusion too. Oh, and Rin enters a beauty pageant in order to rescue Ian. I forget why she thought that would help.

There's a long side-story that made more sense, but reminded me of the duller and more obvious stand-alone stories in Godchild.

So, does anyone have any idea what happened?
I read the first volume way back when, but the second one only recently. Perhaps I was put off, despite the appealingly deranged story, by the art style (skinny bodies and bobbleheads.)

Once there was a great, great, great-- no-- phenomenally amazing man, the Emperor Idea! He ruled the world! (Except, as we learn later, a city called Disorder.) But now he is dead, leaving all in confusion and sorrow.

Until his amnesiac, telekinetic clone named Rose is created. Rose (yes, male) is taken in by a mysterious man named Eiri who rather resembles a bobbleheaded Hakkai (polite and kind yet vaguely sketchy; missing an eye, wears a monocle) and Eiri's companion, the thoroughly badass whip-wielding Ririka.

Rose's main goal is not to be Idea-- to have his own personality and be accepted as an individual. And yet everyone, except perhaps Ririka, is only interested in him insofar as he might take Idea's place. He's taken into the palace, where assorted solicitous butlers and coutiers attempt to make him into the new Emperor, and others try to assassinate him.

And then the plot get even wackier...

Artificial fairies, clonecest, and random Latin )
I read the first volume way back when, but the second one only recently. Perhaps I was put off, despite the appealingly deranged story, by the art style (skinny bodies and bobbleheads.)

Once there was a great, great, great-- no-- phenomenally amazing man, the Emperor Idea! He ruled the world! (Except, as we learn later, a city called Disorder.) But now he is dead, leaving all in confusion and sorrow.

Until his amnesiac, telekinetic clone named Rose is created. Rose (yes, male) is taken in by a mysterious man named Eiri who rather resembles a bobbleheaded Hakkai (polite and kind yet vaguely sketchy; missing an eye, wears a monocle) and Eiri's companion, the thoroughly badass whip-wielding Ririka.

Rose's main goal is not to be Idea-- to have his own personality and be accepted as an individual. And yet everyone, except perhaps Ririka, is only interested in him insofar as he might take Idea's place. He's taken into the palace, where assorted solicitous butlers and coutiers attempt to make him into the new Emperor, and others try to assassinate him.

And then the plot get even wackier...

Artificial fairies, clonecest, and random Latin )
Yuri Narushima is the mangaka who created Planet Ladder (Volume 1), a fantasy series noted for the extreme complexity of its background-- and by extreme, I mean that two volumes in, there was a diagram of seven planes of existence, their political set-ups, and the ways in which they were related to each other that looked like a circuit board and was just as easily comprehensible-- and the fact that the character with the most poignant and tragic backstory was the spirit of a Japanese engineering student who was swept out of the Earth during WWII, and eventually transplanted into the body of a giant robot chicken.

Planet Ladder, apparently loosely based on a Japanese folk tale, loosely follows a basic quest framework, in which a Japanese girl is swept into a fantasy world because she's the Chosen One who has been prophesied. (For those of you who hate Chosen Ones, note that this is satisfyingly upended later on.) She meets an emotionless constructed boy with a gold hand (I think he has a twin, but I forget the details) and has a femmeslashy relationship with a bad-ass woman named... er... Bambi.

In an interlocking plotline, a young man rules a world which succumbs to a horrifying disease which makes your limbs, including your head, suddenly fall off. He is saved only by being put in total isolation. By the time the heroine meets him, he is so traumatized that he passes out if anyone touches him. His sole companion is the giant robot chicken. This is because a scientist was trying to save the population by transplanting their souls into robots. But before this plan could be launched, almost everyone was dead, with only one robot finished, so the last dying man's soul had to be popped into that one. That prototype robot happened to be a giant chicken. Just go with it.

There's also a complicated cross-dimensional political story which I found almost totally incomprehensible. It did not help that in an early volume, when I was still trying to remember who was who, Tokyopop's handy character guide switched the descriptions of the hero and the villain.

Complete in seven volumes, with a somewhat rushed finale but pleasing conclusion. Dense epic fantasy with angsty men, tough women, and a giant robot chicken -- what's not to love? The art's good too.

Young Magician, The: Volume 1 (Young Magician (DC Comics)) also uses the narrative strategy of dropping the reader directly into the middle of the action and letting us try to put together the sense of the quite complex story as we go along. One does get the sense that there is a coherent story, but the fly-on-the-wall viewpoint makes us work to understand it.

As best as I can figure out, the Guino clan of magicians adopted a traumatized, amnesiac little boy during the Crusades and attempted to teach him magic. The boy, Carno Guino, bonded with another magician, Rosalite, whose body stopped growing when she was a child.

It's now modern times in Hong Kong (the magicians are either near-immortal or operating out of a timeless dimension) and Carlo and Rosalite are trying to stop a magician from another clan who is imitating Jack the Ripper in order to read the future in human entrails.

Insanely complex, with tons of largely-untold backstory. The foreground has an unusual amount of social realism, with a sub-theme about the difficulties of racial minorities in Hong Kong. (One character is a Filipina maid, and another is East Indian/British.) The conclusion alternates rather gory magical battles with lengthy infodumping about the relationship of magic and genetics. The tough-talking Carno is apparently one of two main characters, and the other one doesn't even appear in the first volume.

I await the arrival of some sort of Fowl of D00M.
Yuri Narushima is the mangaka who created Planet Ladder, a fantasy series noted for the extreme complexity of its background-- and by extreme, I mean that two volumes in, there was a diagram of seven planes of existence, their political set-ups, and the ways in which they were related to each other that looked like a circuit board and was just as easily comprehensible-- and the fact that the character with the most poignant and tragic backstory was the spirit of a Japanese engineering student who was swept out of the Earth during WWII, and eventually transplanted into the body of a giant robot chicken.

Planet Ladder, apparently loosely based on a Japanese folk tale, loosely follows a basic quest framework, in which a Japanese girl is swept into a fantasy world because she's the Chosen One who has been prophesied. (For those of you who hate Chosen Ones, note that this is satisfyingly upended later on.) She meets an emotionless constructed boy with a gold hand (I think he has a twin, but I forget the details) and has a femmeslashy relationship with a bad-ass woman named... er... Bambi.

In an interlocking plotline, a young man rules a world which succumbs to a horrifying disease which makes your limbs, including your head, suddenly fall off. He is saved only by being put in total isolation. By the time the heroine meets him, he is so traumatized that he passes out if anyone touches him. His sole companion is the giant robot chicken. This is because a scientist was trying to save the population by transplanting their souls into robots. But before this plan could be launched, almost everyone was dead, with only one robot finished, so the last dying man's soul had to be popped into that one. That prototype robot happened to be a giant chicken. Just go with it.

There's also a complicated cross-dimensional political story which I found almost totally incomprehensible. It did not help that in an early volume, when I was still trying to remember who was who, Tokyopop's handy character guide switched the descriptions of the hero and the villain.

Complete in seven volumes, with a somewhat rushed finale but pleasing conclusion. Dense epic fantasy with angsty men, tough women, and a giant robot chicken -- what's not to love? The art's good too.

The Young Magician also uses the narrative strategy of dropping the reader directly into the middle of the action and letting us try to put together the sense of the quite complex story as we go along. One does get the sense that there is a coherent story, but the fly-on-the-wall viewpoint makes us work to understand it.

As best as I can figure out, the Guino clan of magicians adopted a traumatized, amnesiac little boy during the Crusades and attempted to teach him magic. The boy, Carno Guino, bonded with another magician, Rosalite, whose body stopped growing when she was a child.

It's now modern times in Hong Kong (the magicians are either near-immortal or operating out of a timeless dimension) and Carlo and Rosalite are trying to stop a magician from another clan who is imitating Jack the Ripper in order to read the future in human entrails.

Insanely complex, with tons of largely-untold backstory. The foreground has an unusual amount of social realism, with a sub-theme about the difficulties of racial minorities in Hong Kong. (One character is a Filipina maid, and another is East Indian/British.) The conclusion alternates rather gory magical battles with lengthy infodumping about the relationship of magic and genetics. The tough-talking Carno is apparently one of two main characters, and the other one doesn't even appear in the first volume.

I await the arrival of some sort of Fowl of D00M.
This is the sort of story where one can quite honestly write, "I forgot to mention that Heaven and Hell collided some volumes back."

It also features this exchange, which I believe can be appreciated out of context, and is probably the only time in the entire series when I liked Rosiel:

Sandalphon (creepy): Once I have my own body... I will devour you! I'll devour you all!

Rosiel (deadpan): Well, I'll look forward to that, Sandalphon.

You think that lump of flesh clinging to life in that tub is my true form?! )
This is the sort of story where one can quite honestly write, "I forgot to mention that Heaven and Hell collided some volumes back."

It also features this exchange, which I believe can be appreciated out of context, and is probably the only time in the entire series when I liked Rosiel:

Sandalphon (creepy): Once I have my own body... I will devour you! I'll devour you all!

Rosiel (deadpan): Well, I'll look forward to that, Sandalphon.

You think that lump of flesh clinging to life in that tub is my true form?! )
The series sure picked up once they got out of Hell level one, or wherever those interminable battles were going on. Also, the covers are just devastatingly beautiful. I think I need the art book.

The only other non-spoilery thing I can say is that the proofreading is nearly as horrible as Godchild. Here's a list of the tortures of Hell: "The spider, the rack, the pear of anguish." The pear of anguish! I want a flashing icon with the bok choy of D00M, the pineapple of therapy, and the pear of anguish.

ETA: Oh, wait, for once I unfairly maligned the Viz proofreading team. Turns out that's not a misprint for spear, but an actual (and really gruesome) torture device.

My real body is gone, so my master gave me a body made out of plants. )
The series sure picked up once they got out of Hell level one, or wherever those interminable battles were going on. Also, the covers are just devastatingly beautiful. I think I need the art book.

The only other non-spoilery thing I can say is that the proofreading is nearly as horrible as Godchild. Here's a list of the tortures of Hell: "The spider, the rack, the pear of anguish." The pear of anguish! I want a flashing icon with the bok choy of D00M, the pineapple of therapy, and the pear of anguish.

ETA: Oh, wait, for once I unfairly maligned the Viz proofreading team. Turns out that's not a misprint for spear, but an actual (and really gruesome) torture device.

My real body is gone, so my master gave me a body made out of plants. )
rachelmanija: (Bleach: Ichigo)
( Oct. 4th, 2007 10:39 am)
I feel like with this series, one may as well relax and enjoy the utter shounen-ness of it. A few highlights and lowlights:

Live, Ichigo! Live so I can beat you up!! )
rachelmanija: (Bleach: Ichigo)
( Oct. 4th, 2007 10:39 am)
I feel like with this series, one may as well relax and enjoy the utter shounen-ness of it. A few highlights and lowlights:

Live, Ichigo! Live so I can beat you up!! )
Wow, the story sure picked up after the awful piffle arc. I am not certain exactly what's going on, but oh, the angst! Oh, the massive spoilers! )
Wow, the story sure picked up after the awful piffle arc. I am not certain exactly what's going on, but oh, the angst! Oh, the massive spoilers! )
Godchild volume 1, demented manga by Kaori Yuki. The first panel is more cracktastic than entire multi-volume runs of some series.

Narration from the first panel: "Perhaps to ease his lonely soul, Cain starts collecting dangerous poisons. While living with Riff, his manservant since childhood, half-sister Mary Weather-- daughter of his father by a maid-- and Oscar, who wants to wed Mary, Cain meets Dr. Jizabel Disraeli, an assassin of the secret organization 'Delilah.' He wants to rip out Cain's eyes to add to his collection."

Barking mad Gothic horror, made even weirder by the tone-deaf English translation (that should be Merriweather and Jezabel), full of over-the-top horror, Gothic Victoriana, Lewis Carroll allusions, mad killers who wear rabbit masks impregnated with exotic hallucinogens, and disturbing sexual undertones and overtones such as a half-naked pubescent Cain writhing in his sheets, saying to his sexy valet/butler/true love Riff, "I didn't want that guy helping me dress."

Volume 2 contains the Parrot of Doom.

ES (Eternal Sabbath) volume 3, manga by Fuyumi Soryo. Gorgeous, spooky, and smart manga about a young man who can enter the minds of others, and the woman scientist who gets entangled with him. This volume is especially creepy, with great use of white space and silence to induce a sense of paranoia and tension. I continue to be very engaged by the main characters.

The Empty Empire, volume 1, manga by Naoe Kita. From page one: "Beyond the year 2500 AD, he appeared to unite the world: the Emperor Idea."

The telekinetic amnesiac clone of the dead (or is he?!!!) Emperor Idea escapes and is found by an ass-kicking young woman and a strange scientist who looks a lot like Hakkai. There is a sexy butler/valet, and a missing body, and two missing eyes from different people. Everyone's heads are strangely bulbous, and I laughed every time someone referred to Idea, but the characters were growing on me by the end of the volume.

Thud, by Terry Pratchett. Very funny, very smart. Vimes tries to stop Ankh-Morpork from exploding via ethnic tension between the dwarves and the trolls, and also to meet the equal challenge of getting home every night at 6:00 PM to read "Where's My Cow?" to his son. I particularly liked the bits with Mr. Shine. And the Gooseberry. And the girls' night out. And the guy who's supposed to audit the Watch. And I continue to love Vimes.

What the Lady Wants, by Jennifer Crusie. Early romantic comedy, slight but funny. My favorites of her earlier books are still Getting Rid of Bradley (the green hair!) and Manhunting (the terrible fates that befall every man the heroine meets).

Niccolo Rising, by Dorothy Dunnett. I only just started this, but it already makes more sense than A Game of Kings.
Godchild volume 1, demented manga by Kaori Yuki. The first panel is more cracktastic than entire multi-volume runs of some series.

Narration from the first panel: "Perhaps to ease his lonely soul, Cain starts collecting dangerous poisons. While living with Riff, his manservant since childhood, half-sister Mary Weather-- daughter of his father by a maid-- and Oscar, who wants to wed Mary, Cain meets Dr. Jizabel Disraeli, an assassin of the secret organization 'Delilah.' He wants to rip out Cain's eyes to add to his collection."

Barking mad Gothic horror, made even weirder by the tone-deaf English translation (that should be Merriweather and Jezabel), full of over-the-top horror, Gothic Victoriana, Lewis Carroll allusions, mad killers who wear rabbit masks impregnated with exotic hallucinogens, and disturbing sexual undertones and overtones such as a half-naked pubescent Cain writhing in his sheets, saying to his sexy valet/butler/true love Riff, "I didn't want that guy helping me dress."

Volume 2 contains the Parrot of Doom.

ES (Eternal Sabbath) volume 3, manga by Fuyumi Soryo. Gorgeous, spooky, and smart manga about a young man who can enter the minds of others, and the woman scientist who gets entangled with him. This volume is especially creepy, with great use of white space and silence to induce a sense of paranoia and tension. I continue to be very engaged by the main characters.

The Empty Empire, volume 1, manga by Naoe Kita. From page one: "Beyond the year 2500 AD, he appeared to unite the world: the Emperor Idea."

The telekinetic amnesiac clone of the dead (or is he?!!!) Emperor Idea escapes and is found by an ass-kicking young woman and a strange scientist who looks a lot like Hakkai. There is a sexy butler/valet, and a missing body, and two missing eyes from different people. Everyone's heads are strangely bulbous, and I laughed every time someone referred to Idea, but the characters were growing on me by the end of the volume.

Thud, by Terry Pratchett. Very funny, very smart. Vimes tries to stop Ankh-Morpork from exploding via ethnic tension between the dwarves and the trolls, and also to meet the equal challenge of getting home every night at 6:00 PM to read "Where's My Cow?" to his son. I particularly liked the bits with Mr. Shine. And the Gooseberry. And the girls' night out. And the guy who's supposed to audit the Watch. And I continue to love Vimes.

What the Lady Wants, by Jennifer Crusie. Early romantic comedy, slight but funny. My favorites of her earlier books are still Getting Rid of Bradley (the green hair!) and Manhunting (the terrible fates that befall every man the heroine meets).

Niccolo Rising, by Dorothy Dunnett. I only just started this, but it already makes more sense than A Game of Kings.
I realized the other day, while reading an excellent new manga which I shall not name for fear of spoilers, that a lot of manga men have one missing or blind eye. There I was, peacefully reading, and suddenly a man whom I had not expected to do such a thing suddenly revealed that he had one fake eye, which he did in the classic manner of popping it out without warning.

And so I bring you the great manga eyeball angst-off! Note that I have not spoiled anything by not naming which eye trauma goes with which character. Do not spoil anything unless you use white-out.

[Poll #925837]



For bonus credit, state your theories on the prevalence of missing eyes, blindness, why it's only men and generally only the attractive ones, etc.

For super bonus credit, name any female characters with missing or blind eyes.
I realized the other day, while reading an excellent new manga which I shall not name for fear of spoilers, that a lot of manga men have one missing or blind eye. There I was, peacefully reading, and suddenly a man whom I had not expected to do such a thing suddenly revealed that he had one fake eye, which he did in the classic manner of popping it out without warning.

And so I bring you the great manga eyeball angst-off! Note that I have not spoiled anything by not naming which eye trauma goes with which character. Do not spoil anything unless you use white-out.

[Poll #925837]



For bonus credit, state your theories on the prevalence of missing eyes, blindness, why it's only men and generally only the attractive ones, etc.

For super bonus credit, name any female characters with missing or blind eyes.
Since this is even more Gothic in some ways than Nine Coaches Waiting-- more unusual-to-the-genre elements but also more coincidences-- I shall italicize the most Gothic elements once more. Antonia Moncrieff, a beautiful editor with a thirteen-year-old son, receives a surprise inheritance: a big house. Yep, girl meets house. This one is a brownstone in Brooklyn. Antonia is an orphan who has changed her name to escape her dark past and evil ex-husband, but her aunt was the housekeeper for the Standish family and inherited the house from Mrs. Standish when the lost heir who was supposed to get it could not be found, and the aunt left it to Antonia.

Meanwhile, Antonia is assigned to edit the latest book by genius Pulitzer Prize-winning author Adam Kingsley, who was disgraced, jailed, and blinded after he killed a child in a drunken hit-and-run accident. Adam's now out of jail. Antonia had an affair with him thirteen years ago, but he doesn't recognize her because he's blind, and she doesn't tell him who she is. (Much like Lurlene McDaniel's Carley!) In order to facilitate the editing, he moves into her new brownstone, which has a mysterious draft, hidden passageways, and evildoers who want it or something in it. Her ex-husband, who turns out to be a Standish, comes out of the woodwork and blackmails her. I was going to spoiler-cut the next part, but since I don't think anyone else is ever likely to read this I won't; if you don't want to be spoiled for the most ridiculous and unnecessary plot twist ever, stop reading now. Adam turns out to be the missing heir.

This book is chiefly interesting because Antonia's son, animal-obsessed Ewan, is a dry run for Alan in Holland's later YA novel Alan and the Animal Kingdom, in which teen orphan Alan tries to live by himself after his last remaining relative dies, because he has pets and the last time a relative died they were all put to sleep. More spoilers ahead, though again, the book is long since out of print and this isn't a surprise ending...

It concludes on a "realistic" note of sort-of hope amidst the general misery and despair: Alan is adopted, and his pets aren't killed, but he has to give them all away because his new adoptive mother is allergic to animal fur. As a consolation prize, he's given a poodle puppy that he doesn't love. It occurs to me now that this ending isn't really more realistic: a family that would adopt a son on a moment's notice might not hesitate to take in his pets too, and the deadly allergy is just there because a real happy ending, presumably, might give kid readers hope that sometimes things really do work out OK.
Since this is even more Gothic in some ways than Nine Coaches Waiting-- more unusual-to-the-genre elements but also more coincidences-- I shall italicize the most Gothic elements once more. Antonia Moncrieff, a beautiful editor with a thirteen-year-old son, receives a surprise inheritance: a big house. Yep, girl meets house. This one is a brownstone in Brooklyn. Antonia is an orphan who has changed her name to escape her dark past and evil ex-husband, but her aunt was the housekeeper for the Standish family and inherited the house from Mrs. Standish when the lost heir who was supposed to get it could not be found, and the aunt left it to Antonia.

Meanwhile, Antonia is assigned to edit the latest book by genius Pulitzer Prize-winning author Adam Kingsley, who was disgraced, jailed, and blinded after he killed a child in a drunken hit-and-run accident. Adam's now out of jail. Antonia had an affair with him thirteen years ago, but he doesn't recognize her because he's blind, and she doesn't tell him who she is. (Much like Lurlene McDaniel's Carley!) In order to facilitate the editing, he moves into her new brownstone, which has a mysterious draft, hidden passageways, and evildoers who want it or something in it. Her ex-husband, who turns out to be a Standish, comes out of the woodwork and blackmails her. I was going to spoiler-cut the next part, but since I don't think anyone else is ever likely to read this I won't; if you don't want to be spoiled for the most ridiculous and unnecessary plot twist ever, stop reading now. Adam turns out to be the missing heir.

This book is chiefly interesting because Antonia's son, animal-obsessed Ewan, is a dry run for Alan in Holland's later YA novel Alan and the Animal Kingdom, in which teen orphan Alan tries to live by himself after his last remaining relative dies, because he has pets and the last time a relative died they were all put to sleep. More spoilers ahead, though again, the book is long since out of print and this isn't a surprise ending...

It concludes on a "realistic" note of sort-of hope amidst the general misery and despair: Alan is adopted, and his pets aren't killed, but he has to give them all away because his new adoptive mother is allergic to animal fur. As a consolation prize, he's given a poodle puppy that he doesn't love. It occurs to me now that this ending isn't really more realistic: a family that would adopt a son on a moment's notice might not hesitate to take in his pets too, and the deadly allergy is just there because a real happy ending, presumably, might give kid readers hope that sometimes things really do work out OK.
rachelmanija: (Default)
( Aug. 20th, 2004 11:28 am)
Yesterday my refrigerator defrosted, which I of course didn't notice until after eating something from it, after which I felt vaguely nauseated all day and had to replace everything in the fridge, which luckily was not much. (Do pickles go bad after a defrosting incident? What about mustard?)

I took that as an excuse to go to the Japanese market with the used manga (in Japanese only) adjunct store. The women there do speak English, but they'll let me practice Japanese on them as long as I don't take too long to understand what they're saying. If I hesitate more than ten seconds, they'll translate. It makes me feel like I'm on Japanese Jeopardy, and makes shopping there a bit unnerving.

Me: "Saiyuki wa arimasu ka?"

Two ladies and young man: Blank stares.

Me: "Ah, Gensomaden Saiyuki?"

Two ladies and young man: Blank stares.

Beat.

Young man (enlightenment dawning): "SAI-yuki?"

Me: Hai!

Two ladies: Ah, SAI-yuki!

Me (in my mind only): Huh?

The young man led me to-- score! -- volumes two, three, and-- double score! five-- in Japanese, two bucks each, original Japanese covers, oversize format the better to ogle the guys with, and also with lettering large enough that the hiragana cheats next to the kanji are mostly legible.

I spent much of this morning attempting to read volume five. My Japanese sucks. I wouldn't have understood any of it if I hadn't seen the anime already. It's the one that's mostly an extended flashback to everyone meeting for the first time-- well, the first time since Heaven-- beginning when Gojyo picks Hakkai up off the middle of the forest path and then after a lot of spoilery stuff they become roommates. Or possibly "roommates." There was a drawing of condom wrappers with an explanation I couldn't understand at all, but was probably, "They're for Gojyo's girlfriends. Girlfriends. Definitely girlfriends. To repeat: girlfriends."

Also, if anyone has read that far already in Japanese or scanlations... how shall I phrase this... does it make any sense whatsoever for Hakkai to wear a monocle? I mean, is that explained at all? Do the monks have really incredible healing powers that Sanzo himself never learned?

I also bought a CLAMP comic I never heard of called REX, about a cute little dinosaur. I wanted to buy some X, but they only had volumes I already had, with no additional or different art.

The market offered some new Pocky flavors: coconut milk, orange/chocolat, cream, cookies and cream, and maple custard.







what flavor pocky are you?



[c] sugardew



I also bought some darling little teeny weeny kawaii miniature sushi/sake sets, the ones that come in little numbered boxes where you have to collect all five hundred to get a complete banquet set. They also come with little white tablets. I'm not sure if those are candies or drying pellets. After the defrosting experience I was afraid to try one.
.

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