staranise: A star anise floating in a cup of mint tea (Default)
([personal profile] staranise Mar. 24th, 2017 11:42 pm)
Tomorrow is my 30th birthday and I’m going to go to a friend’s wedding shower and pick up a balloon bouquet I got for myself and flowers that my girlfriend sent me and have dinner with my family incl. all my in-town nephews and I’m going to tie a balloon to the youngest one and watch him run around trying to charm the cats. (I forget if I mentioned, this week my sister in law sent us a video where she asks him, “Where do you want to go?” and he says “GAW-LA-GER. GRAMMA. KITTY!”)

When i was a little kid I used to dream of being in my 30s. I always wanted to grow up. Being an adult was when you got to choose where you lived, what you ate, who you spent time with, what you got to do. Even when I was eight, I dreamed so hard of being settled in my career with a spouse and family, able to right some of the wrongs I saw in the world and make art that mattered.

Getting here has been so hard--and between mental illness and the economy, I’m not nearly as settled, married, or fecund as I’d like to be--but you know the fuck what, I’m happy to be here anyway.
Fannish/Geeky Things

"The Fansplaining Definitions Survey". "This project is a production of the Fansplaining podcast, which is run by Elizabeth Minkel and Flourish Klink. You can learn more about us at fansplaining.com. We're not academics and this is not an academic survey, but we do strive to discuss and learn more about fandom in general. (We're both, by the way, longtime fanfic readers and writers.)"

Fan-made "Deadpool Musical - Beauty and the Beast "Gaston" Parody". [YouTube, ~6 minutes (including credits)]

"Once More With Feeling: On the afterlife of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, what makes a show resonate for two decades, and why we re-watch television".

"Marvel’s Netflix Shows Need to Get More Comfortable with the MCU".


Writing/SFF

I liked Daniel José Older's NaNoWriMo pep talk.

"The SFF Equine: From Companions to Dragons". [Judith Tarr at Tor.com] "Both McCaffrey and Lackey based their magical beasts on a particular horse-human partnership: that of the riders and the (mostly) white stallions of the Spanish Riding School of Vienna. The horses are called Lipizzaner or Lipizzans in tribute to the original stud farm at Lipica in what is now Slovenia, and have been bred to much the same standard since the sixteenth century. They’re short, stocky, sturdy, strong, and highly intelligent. And they’ve been bred to favor individuals that bond with a single rider for, in the best case, the life of the horse."

"V.E. Schwab Expanding A Darker Shade of Magic With New Stories, Fan Art". (This is a collector's edition of the novel, not a whole new book.)

"Tale as old as time? We explore spin-offs, reboots and racebending". [[twitter.com profile] readingtheend guest-posting at OxfordWords blog]

"How Disney's 'Beauty and the Beast' Became the Darkest Tale of All: Despite the musical numbers, the 1991 Disney film is actually the darkest retelling of the popular fairy tale". [Genevieve Valentine at Vice]

"The Savage Other as a Stereotype in Fiction". [Kate Elliott]


Miscellaneous

Julia sent me this YouTube link: "The Birthday Boys - Gotta Catch My Shows". It's so true. ;_; See also: today's Wondermark.

"How to download a GIF from Twitter?" [Ezgif.com] It's not perfect--I think maybe it's rejecting some file formats?--but so far it's the most reasonable way I've found to nab "gifs" from Twitter. (Scare quotes because Twitter's idea of what to do with a gif is convert it to a video.)

"53 Pictures Only Introverts Can Truly Appreciate". [Buzzfeed] An alarming number of these are accurate for me. O_o

"Chris Evans Is Ready To Fight: His success as Captain America has made Chris Evans one of Hollywood's sure things, which means he can do whatever he wants with his free time. So why jump out of airplanes and get into it with David Duke?" [Esquire]

"This Adorable Pup Named Biden Just Got To Meet Former VP Joe Biden". [Buzzfeed]

"ModCloth Has Been Sold to Walmart—and Their Customers are Pissed". [The Mary Sue]

Via [dreamwidth.org profile] cofax7, "A Book of Creatures" is a blog that posts about "entities of myth, legend, and folklore", and notes "WARNING: May contain sex, violence, and divine retribution."

A dress that changes from a simpler ball gown to a butterfly dress. [Facebook video]

"A 130-Year-Old Fact About Dinosaurs Might Be Wrong: New research on the creatures’ family tree could “shake dinosaur paleontology to its core.”".
selenak: (Peggy and Jarvis by Asthenie_VD)
([personal profile] selenak Mar. 25th, 2017 03:05 pm)
Dear writer, thank you so much for participating in this challenge and creating a story for me. I included some prompts in my requests. Know that if none of these speaks to you, you can still make me happy simply by "Peggy and Jarvis fight crime" case fic. My prompts tend to go in a gen direction, but I'm not averse to shipping, either slash or het or multi, provided you don't put down another another relationship in your story. What I am averse to is character bashing: by which I don't mean character A having a bad opinion of character B, if this is the case in canon or can be extrapolated from it, plus one of my prompts involves villains in central roles, and these people are canonically responsible for horrendous acts. However, there is a difference between that and "ugh, X is the WORST, says every other character ever" type of storytelling, and I trust you, writer, are able to see it.

Re: all the characters not named in my prompts - I'm an ensemble fan and fond of everyone, though of course I have my favourites. Still, just because they're not listed doesn't mean I don't enjoy reading about them, though if you want to work your own favourite into one of the prompts in a prominent role, go ahead, as long as my listed characters have one, too.

Now, about those prompts )
oursin: Hedgehog saying boggled hedgehog is boggled (Boggled hedgehog)
([personal profile] oursin Mar. 24th, 2017 09:16 pm)

While I have quite oft remarked that, if you want to exercise regularly, it really helps if where you do it is easy to get to, and something that may not be the absolutely ideal thing but close at hand is more likely to actually get done on a relatively regularly basis than something that might be optimum but a faff to get to. (This probably applies to other things as well.)

But while this article more or less substantiates The Wisdom of the Hedjog in principle, I was a bit beswozzled by the travel distance cited - 3.7 miles - which does not strike me as what I would consider a walkable distance, at least if one's combining it (there and back) with a workout.

It's a different world. And I would like to know, are we talking public transport? or driving? to get there.

Reiterates anecdote of walking from where I was staying in Austin TX to Zilker Park, through entirely deserted streets, and found when I got there hordes of people who had driven there to walk, jog, etc.

selenak: (Ben by Idrilelendil)
([personal profile] selenak Mar. 25th, 2017 09:40 am)
The last few days were somewhat more cloudy than our first few in New Zealand, but with treats like this one at Te Anau Lake, who cares?

Regenbogen ber Te Anau photo IMG_0883_zps1vczszxb.jpg

Though there was that time when a guy named Ben stranded me on an island in the Tasmanian Sea... )
Five random things on Friday afternoon:

a. I realized I'd miscalculated and only had enough lettuce for four days of lunch salads. I still have croutons, cranberries, cheese, and cashews walnuts (the alliteration was working there for a minute), but no more romaine. So I had an everything bagel with scallion cream cheese and it sure was tasty.

2. Why is it so hard to find a nice red patent leather tote bag? It doesn't even have to be real leather? I would take PVC! But apparently it's not in style now? I don't understand - how does red patent leather ever go out of style?

iii. I went to bed early last night - the past two nights I've had that low-grade fever feeling, with the aches and the chills - and slept okay but I still did not want to get out of bed this morning. I am hopefully going to get some sleep over the weekend.

D. so in the oft-mentioned but still unfinished Thing 1 and Thing 2, I've been trying not to repeat events (it's the same overall story told from two POVs), but I came to a thing that I think has to be told twice - once when it happens, and then once again later, as told by the person it happened to directly. I think that makes it less repetitive? I don't know. I still haven't figured it all out. I've never really done a thing like this before, where it's separate stories rather than just sections from different POVs. I guess we'll see how it works if I ever finish them.

5. Alyssa texted me that she was feeling sad on Wednesday so she put two of the songs from the Flash/Supergirl musical ("Super Friend" and "Put a Little Love in Your Heart") on repeat along with "Hooked on a Feeling," "December 1963 (Oh What a Night)," and the Lego Batman song and found it very cheering. In case you also feel in need of happiness.

Sigh. I am so ready to go home.

***
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([personal profile] ladyofleithian Mar. 24th, 2017 02:16 pm)
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQHqzhgVTRI&t=207s

I don't know if it's going to be in the movie or just a theory, but dang. If they actually include this in The Last Jedi, it'll be incredibly cathartic. Especially considering all the bullcrap that the Jedi taught in the prequels. (I apologize to any Jedi/prequels fans on my f-list at any rate, but I couldn't stand the Jedi in the prequels. They were just...insufferable) Not to mention KOTOR and KOTOR II, as much as I adore both games. And the LOTF series. And that scene in Crucible where Faux Skywalker (can't take credit for that; arkan2 came up with that nickname) is a complete self-righteous jerk to a Padawan. (Not gonna lie, when the opening title crawl of TFA was "Luke Skywalker has vanished", I think I might have been kind of relieved. Sort of like, "Oh, good. Some breathing space. I can have some time to breathe.") So, who knows? Maybe Disney's version of the Jedi (that being Rey and Luke) will actually learn from the old Order's mistakes. 

So...thoughts? Comments? Defenses of the old Jedi Order? I'm interested. :) 
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oracne: turtle (Default)
([personal profile] oracne Mar. 24th, 2017 08:32 am)
If you want to email/write/fax your reps and senators about any of these issues, feel free to crib from me, edit, whatever.

1. The AHCA amendments are even less acceptable than the bill itself – the one which concerns me is that one of the amendments would remove the requirement that health plans sold to individuals and small businesses must cover essential health benefits, many of which affect me personally. I do not trust the state of Pennsylvania to determine what basic health benefits my insurance must include. My state could even cut all of the ten essential health benefits, or refuse to set a minimum amount of coverage.

That amendment is preposterous. Please vote [representative] encourage your colleagues to vote [senators] against it.


2. Confirmation hearings for Neil Gorsuch should be delayed while the FBI’s investigation into governmental ties with Russia is still in progress. Investigation of multiple members of the administration is worrisome and should be central at this time.

Additionally, lifetime appointments to SCOTUS should not be made by an administration that is potentially seriously tainted.


3. Attorney General Sessions’ recusal from the investigation into Russian hacking was only the minimum required. He should also resign, and accept whatever penalties he incurred for his documented misconduct.

Please demand that the integrity of the office of Attorney General be upheld.


4. I made this one more generalized than the one I actually sent. The NEA, the NHA, and the CPB provide funding that is minimal but still helps to employ large numbers of American artists. Musicians perform concerts and attract a steady audience from both the city and the surrounding areas.

Audiences don’t just sit and listen; both before and after the performances, they park their cars, eat in restaurants, drink in bars, do a little shopping if they happen to be early – in short, they spend money which helps local businesses. At the concerts, attendees meet their neighbors and make plans to attend still more concerts, buying more tickets, spending more money, something that doesn’t happen when you listen to music at home, alone.

The arts are a vital part of our economy as well as our culture. Please support funding for the NEA, the NHA, and the CPB.


5. I strongly oppose the President's proposed budget. The current outline will slash funding for the State Department, foreign aid, and every domestic agency while instead adding $54 billion in military spending, when we already spend far more than is needed for this purpose. If some of this money went to support our soldiers, their families, and our veterans and their healthcare needs, I might be onboard, but as it is, this is a ridiculous waste.

Please remember those in our state who continue to pledge their lives and their bodies to protect us, and support them rather than voting for useless spending on more weapons.
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staranise: A star anise floating in a cup of mint tea (Default)
([personal profile] staranise Mar. 24th, 2017 01:22 am)
I just feel really discouraged with Tumblr this week.

Yes!!! I am aware that my viral post du jour does not adequately address the racial, class, and economic factors that make the concept inaccessible to other people!!! It also does not cite the geneaology of the concepts I used. I wrote it in half an hour before I collapsed with pain and fatigue. I don't actually find the concept accessible either; it's a vague sketch of "ideas I wish were not fundamentally poisoned for me." My apologies for failing to attain perfection in an endeavour that neither contributes to my livelihood nor furthers my career.
Title: Dark Orbit (Twenty Planets)
Author: Carolyn Ives Gilman
Narrator: Melanie Ewbank
Published: Blackstone Audio, 2015
Rating: 4 of 5
Page Count: 300
Total Page Count: 208,230
Text Number: 634
Read Because: reviewed by Rosamund, audiobook borrowed from the Multnomah County Library
Review: Sara Callicot travels to a newly discovered habitable planet located in a pocket of bizarre phenomena in order to spy on another member of the exploratory crew, cLassiter. The planet Iris is beautiful and strange, but this initial premise in no way conveys the variety of speculative concepts which come into play: multiple alien cultures, disability and culture-building, alternate forms of perception and dimensions and travel. Cultural and methodological diversity functions as a tool to explore these concepts, and as such individual character development—primarily for Thora—is strong. Interpersonal relationships go undeveloped; this keeps the focus on the speculative concepts, but it might have been nice to see more perception-clash, especially between the protagonists. But I'm a sucker for high speculative concepts which are made accessible by studying the experiences of those enmeshed within them; in that way, this reminds me of Rosemary Kirstein's Steerswoman series—Kirstein does a better job developing and capitalizing on interpersonal aspects, but both emphasize the individual's engagement with research, phenomena, and worldview adjustments, and Gilman also offers strong, multi-sensory descriptions. I'm not entirely content with Dark Orbit's conclusions*, but the journey to them is compelling and stimulating. This takes place in a shared universe, and, while it stands alone, I would love to read more Gilman someday.

* Initially, the depictions of mental illness and blindness are unromanticized—but by the conclusion, both become forms of or tools for seeing outside normal human perception; this resolution makes sense in context, and disabled characters retain agency and humanity, but the elision still makes me uncomfortable.

(What a strange audio experience! The voice used for the Sara's third person narration was obnoxious; for Thora's diary, rich and thoughtful. I admire the narrator's ability to assume such different tones, but Sara's opening sections almost made me DNF.)


Title: Servant of the Underworld (Obsidian and Blood Book 1)
Author: Aliette de Bodard
Published: Angry Robot, 2012
Rating: 3 of 5
Page Count: 430
Total Page Count: 208,660
Text Number: 635
Read Because: enjoyed the author's short story "Immersion," ebook borrowed from the Multnomah County Library
Review: In the Aztec Empire, Acatl is pulled from his duties as a funeral priest to investigate the violent disappearance of a priestess, a crime which implicates his brother. This reminds me of Amanda Downum's The Bone Palace: murder mystery as impetus to explore a fantasy setting and magic system. It's not a format I enjoy (I prefer my murder mysteries in short form); regardless, this isn't a particularly successful example of it—it's more of a plot McGuffin than a mystery that the reader can solve. The setting and magic system are marginally more successful—they're a welcome change from genre tradition, and the magic is complex, diverse, and occasionally interacts with characters in dynamic ways. But Bodard's descriptions are unevocative and primarily visual, so the magic fails to feel as powerful as it needs to be. In theory, this is a compelling first effort; but in practice, it's just not that compelling. I'd love to see more books in this setting, and so may attempt the sequels; this first book stands alone, but I wouldn't recommend it.


Title: The Gracekeepers
Author: Kirsty Logan
Narrator: Katy Townsend
Published: Random House Audio, 2015
Rating: 4 of 5
Page Count: 300
Total Page Count: 208,960
Text Number: 636
Read Because: multiple booktube mentions, audiobook borrowed from the Multnomah County Library
Review: A circus performer and funerary hermit cross paths in a flooded world which is socially divided between seafarers and landlockers. The setting and language and atmosphere are all phenomenal—similar to Emily St. John Mandel's Station Eleven, but significantly more evocative: a dreamy ocean landscape, almost magical realist in style. The relationship between the protagonists, and their relationships with their respective social roles, are compelling; it's a long and distant romance, perhaps frustrating only because it's subtextual. But the intermediary aspects are less successful. Too much time better spent with the protagonists is given to hopping between stock supporting characters; the worldbuilding falls for some YA genre clichés, too delineated, chock full of proper nouns. When this is good, it's very very good—one of my more pleasant recent reading experiences in recent memory. I just wishes its occasional lapses of subtly didn't hold it back.
staranise: A star anise floating in a cup of mint tea (Default)
([personal profile] staranise Mar. 23rd, 2017 11:44 pm)
Just finished reading: Fair Play by Josh Lanyon

I read the first book in the series, Fair Game, not long after it came out in 2010. It's stuck in my head ever since then. The series is M/M romance and mystery thriller, and part of what amazed me is that the romance was written as intricately as the crime; I was amazed at how the entire tone of the novel shifted without anything being detectably different, and traced the shift back down to a single word in a sex scene that cause a cascading shift of perceptions of peoples' motives and reactions. It was impressive.

So this month Audible coughed up a recommendation for another Lanyon book and I checked it out, and behold! It was the further adventures of the two protagonists from Fair Game. Since romance novels almost always end just as the relationship gets truly underway, I was all up in that shit. After I finished Book 2, I immediately bought and began Book 3. I then took a break from Book 3 to make a cup of tea and play with my cat, and wanted to sit down and write this out while it was still fresh in my mind.

Fair Play is fascinating because it's all about CONFLICT in the relationship and it's glorious. (That is, there are a couple mystery plots, but while I'll read them I won't pretend they're important to me.) Elliot, the protagonist, left the FBI when he was injured in the line of duty; he now teaches university history. Tucker, his boyfriend, is still an active FBI agent. Elliot's an extremely logical guy doesn't understand his own emotions super well, who's used to the people in his life giving him a lot of autonomy and independence; Tucker's a former foster kid who's put a lot of work into understanding himself and is leaping aboard the emotional closeness train with alacrity, but he's very used to being either totally self-sufficient or taking care of other people--not to having a partner, much less someone who wants to take care of him. They love each other, but they start off not knowing very much about how to share their decision-making processes, how to argue productively, or how to show love and concern for each other without surrendering their autonomy or self-respect.

And you know what? They god-damn well figure it out. They love each other so much that rather than break up, they keep finding ways to introspect, express their feelings, advocate for their viewpoints, understand each other, and work it through. It's especially interesting to watch from Elliot's perspective. He's so very unlike me in a way that reminded me of my own special perspective and skills--when he's sitting there thinking, "Why am I angry? It doesn't make sense when you look at the logical situation" I'm screaming "ATTACHMENT THEORY!" but that's not how he operates. But at the same time, his emotional process was written in what felt like a very accurate and honest fashion--he does try, honestly and intelligently, and when he has an emotional breakthrough he faces it wholeheartedly and works it through with such dedication you can see why he tries not to have them too often.

There are occasional sour notes in the narration, especially around women or fat people, that make me a little uncomfortable because I can't quite tell whether it's Lanyon's opinion or just that Elliot is very like Dan Savage in that as a stoic fit white cis gay man from the Pacific Northwest, Elliot has internalized a set of prejudices he's never felt the need to question--he takes for granted that, for example, aging women who express alarm in response to others' misfortune and attempt to emotionally mother others are an alien, offputting, and unattractive species, from whom he would rather distance himself, and never thought more about the topic.

Still. I've finished my cup of tea, so I'm gonna go back to Book 3.
thistleingrey: (Default)
([personal profile] thistleingrey Mar. 23rd, 2017 10:51 pm)
* I almost have my MRI referral, yay. First I must go for an X-ray, boo, because my med insurance requires one before the other. The facility has walk-in X-rays, boo, and to get in line, I'll have to rise even earlier, which usually leads to Reason's early rising, too, double boo. It's more than 5 km from the office, boo, on a bus line, yay.

I don't understand the logic that requires irradiation to rule out bone chips before imaging soft tissue, given that I have partial use of my shoulder---continually so since the fall three months ago. I am enormously glad to have partial use of my shoulder, to be clear: I can type and handwrite, get into a shirt without much trouble, open a lightweight door, even do forearm planks and ± hang the laundry. (I hang everything besides sheets because I like wearing things out, not having the dryer do it for me.) I can't hand my child a fork or spoon without pain, however, given where we sit at table: angle of extension, not how demanding the task is. After my grumpy post about near-total lack of abduction, I tried the bicycle, which overtaxed my left shoulder in compensation but led to a nap, not a fall. ...yay? (Informed risks are part and parcel of chronic pain, anyway.) While I read random web things, my left hand uses the mouse while my right arm bends and curls into my ribs unbidden, as though my body could protect it. Sorry, arm and axle; please keep waiting.

* Reason is so annoyed that Hidden Figures the book is "for grownups" and has "a ton of text." Wait two or three years, little one, and you'll probably skate through it. (She wouldn't be so irritated were she unable to conceive of herself reading it.) There's apparently a Young Readers version, but our nearest library doesn't have it.
I am going to LISTEN TO THINGS and FIGURE OUT PERCUSSION if it kills me. Thank you so much, iTunes Shuffle!

ObDisclaimer: Just my opinions, I have no music degree, this is me analyzing music for my own benefit and I don't claim this will make sense to anyone else, comments/criticisms welcome.

Read more... )
The OA, season 1, 2016
I can't talk about this show without spoilers; be ye warned. Insofar as the purpose of a piece of media is to engage and stimulate, this succeeds. I don't find it necessarily to decide or clarify the "objective truth" of OA's story, but I do think the show tries to do too much in putting it into question—it's a slow, spread-out narrative, and then so much is crammed into the many hanging threads of the final episode; it's cheap and underdeveloped. But I'm sold on that slow narrative, in both structure and content, from the modern set dressing to the speculative elements to the framed narrative to the unreliable narrator; that it's a contemporary/SF movie given a 10-hour runtime actually makes it more immersive. I'm even more content than not with the final episode, more for the purpose it achieves than how it does so, although I don't know how they can make a second season work after the intentional and strained ambiguity of the finale. This was an experience—not always successful, not always smooth, a little smug and back-weighted, but it held me; I wanted to read about it and talk about it after I finished watching, all signs that I was engaged.

Santa Clarita Diet, season 1, 2017
This is sincerely charming; so charming that I can overlook the fact it's essentially a quirky White suburban romantic comedy. It's gleefully morbid, excessively so, shamelessly so, overshooting gorn and landing in the territory of corny but legitimately icky—which must be the counterpoint that I need to sell me on the rest. (It helps, too, that I love Drew Barrymore, although they really don't know how to do her hair.) I wish the pacing were better, I wish the season had any sense of finality—instead of just feeling like it had finally developed a larger plot, none the least because the premise is the more engaging narrative. But while I bounce off most humor, this worked for me. It's endearing and gross and dark and I approve.

Sherlock, series 3 and "The Abominable Bride", 2013-2014 and 2016
Spending a while away from this show really serves to highlight its flaws upon return. It's not half so clever or logical as it needs to be, borrowing poorly from the source material as far as cases are concerned. It's overacted; the humor misses its mark. Sherlock himself is wildly unpleasant, and scenes like John's forgiveness on the train are simply—ironically—unforgivable. And then there's an episode like "His Last Vow," which manages to expand on the original material, which hammers home the show's dynamic and characterization, which is tightly written and uses the obtrusive styling to its best advantage. My sum experience with BBC Sherlock tends to be negative, but it's highlights like that which make me keep trying.

Finding Dory, film, 2016, dirs. Andrew Stanton and Angus MacLane
This is such an active, compassionate, empowered narrative about disability, and some later scenes are fantastic. I sincerely appreciate the depiction of accommodation and internalized discrimination; it's tear-jerking in the right way, substantial but uplifting. But a character magically overcoming an injury/disability is unequivocally awful; and I've seen arguments that the humorous exploitation and derision of other disabled characters functions both to depict a discriminatory society and invite viewers to question why they participate in it—except that it doesn't, the humor goes almost entirely unchallenged, and it's wildly out of place and disgusting. I went into this having read some criticisms, and I'm glad for that—or I probably would have stalled out at the one-third mark. The sum is positive, but there's no excuse for the missteps—ever, really, but especially in this context.

The Joy of Painting Netflix Series, Bob Ross: Beauty is Everywhere & Chill with Bob Ross
Full episodes of the show's entire run are also on YouTube, so I'm still watching Bob Ross—but I didn't discover that until watching the Netflix compilations. They're composed of selected episodes from later seasons (~27-31), which makes for the highest quality video and most familiar techniques (in narration, painting, and filming). Chill is winter scenes, and many of Ross's winter paintings are warm-toned and a bit fuzzy; this is the selection that grows most repetitive, but I also watched it during winter in a moment of kismet: during the stress of the holidays, Netflix gave me Bob Ross. Beauty is Everywhere is general landscapes and seascapes, but a solid selection of those, highlighting a number of the black-canvas paintings which Ross particularly loved and I do too. There isn't a particular reason to watch these selected episodes, they're hardly the only good ones, but they are good, consistently watchable, and have all the markers that make this series enjoyable.
yhlee: Alto clef and whole note (middle C). (alto clef)
([personal profile] yhlee Mar. 23rd, 2017 04:05 pm)
I'm putting this behind a cut because I'm guessing composing/MIDI sequencing working notes will bore most of y'all. ;) OTOH, this is an easy way to keep track of what I'm doing!

BTW, I will never get tired of the rainbow the LEDs on the Komplete Kontrol S88 makes when you turn it on. I am easily distracted?

Read more... )
calissa: A black and white photo of a large, dark teapot and a small Chinese teacup with a fish painted on the side (Tea)
([personal profile] calissa Mar. 24th, 2017 08:00 am)

GUFF interviews, kangaroo, Earl Grey Editing, Elizabeth Fitzgerald

The Get Up-and-over Fan Fund is designed to promote connections between fandoms in Australasia and Europe. This year GUFF will send one delegate from Australiasia to Worldcon in Helsinki in August. Voting is open to all interested fans, regardless of nationality. It closes 17 April.

Deciding how to rank the candidates can be a pretty daunting prospect, so over the next few weeks Earl Grey Editing will be featuring an interview with each candidate. So far I’ve interviewed Belle McQuattie, Donna Maree Hanson and Sam Hawke. Joining me today is Alexandra Pierce.

First and most vital: What’s your favourite beverage?

My favourite hot beverage is black tea; I go in for flavoured ones like Earl Grey or some of the fruity ones from T2. Cold well, I have a weakness for elderflower cordial and New Zealand sauvignon blanc. Of course.

Yum. Elderflower cordial with tonic water is one of my Christmas traditions.

Oh nice! I have Plans to investigate elderflower as an ingredient.

How did you come to be involved in Australian SFF fandom?

Through Alisa Krasnostein! A friend got me reading the Aussie magazine Andromeda Spaceways; Alisa was interviewed and said she was looking for reviewers for her review site at the time (Australian Spec Fic in Focus), I emailed her and then all of sudden I was going to cons and the rest of it.

You host a feminist SFF podcast called Galactic Suburbia with Alisa Krasnostein and Tansy Rayner Roberts. Your seventh anniversary was earlier this month. What has been the most memorable part of the podcast for you?

Whoa seven years. Thats amazing. At the Australian Worldcon in 2010, we were at the Hugos ceremony and someone behind us said “Hey, listening to you two is like being on my commute!” We love feedback and feeling like part of a community. Also, winning a Hugo Award was pretty memorable. Plus, I get a regular date with two awesome women. Weve talked about some amazing stuff.

Winning a Hugo Award is definitely something that’s going to stick in the memory.

I was watching the live stream. It cut out as they said our name and then our acceptor was on the stage. I cried.

In addition to the GS podcast, you also teach, review books, write a column for Tor.com, and run a couple of blogs, as well as another podcast (on cooking). Have I missed anything? How do you manage to juggle it all? Do you have any tips on how to steal a TARDIS?

Uh yeh ok, when you put it like that it sounds like I do a lot! I also cook and occasionally do house work; I try to get away for astronomy occasionally, too. How do I fit it all in? Well, I dont have kids or pets. That certainly helps. I also work part time as a teacher and have done for a while, which gives more time not only during the week but also at night and on weekends when otherwise I would be planning or marking. I dont always manage to juggle everything – sometimes I drop balls all over the place. I guess I keep doing the things Im doing because theyre all things I WANT to be doing, so doing them is (usually) enjoyable. That definitely helps. As for using a TARDIS I think of Hermione and her time-turner and I think that would be a very bad idea. Id just end up confused.

What’s coming up next for you?

I’m editing a collection of non-fiction in honour of Octavia Butler, which is tremendously exciting; I’ll also be hosting a Facebook book club, on the first Sunday of the month from March to June, on a few of Butler’s books.

I loved Letters to Tiptree, so I’m really looking forward to this new anthology.

Were excited! Its called Luminescent Threads: Connections to Octavia Butler.

Wow, what a great title!

What are you most looking forward to about Worldcon 75?

Meeting people! At the 2010 Worldcon I was very new to the scene and very shy. I’m still very shy but at least this time I have had contact with people who will be there, so I’ll feel more like I’m *allowed* to talk to them!

Alexandra Pierce, Galactic Suburbia

Alexandra Pierce reads, teaches, blogs, podcasts, cooks, knits, runs, eats, sleeps, and observes the stars. Not necessarily in that order of priority. She is a Christian, a feminist, and an Australian. She can be found at her website, and on the Hugo-winning Galactic Suburbia podcast.

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Mirrored from Earl Grey Editing.

rydra_wong: The display board of a train reads "this train is fucked". (this train is fucked)
([personal profile] rydra_wong Mar. 23rd, 2017 08:01 pm)
that it's NOT just awesome people dying lately:

The New York Times: Joseph Nicolosi, Advocate of Conversion Therapy for Gays, Dies at 70

From five years ago, here's an account of the sort of damage he did (content note for suicidal ideation):

Gabriel Arana: My So-Called Ex-Gay Life
swan_tower: (Default)
([personal profile] swan_tower Mar. 23rd, 2017 12:52 pm)

I realized recently that not only do I not have an icon for Within the Sanctuary of Wings, I don’t have one for In the Labyrinth of Drakes, either.

So! I have two ARCs of Sanctuary to offer in exchange for people making me pretty icons out of the cover art for those books. You can find the full images for Labyrinth here and Sanctuary here. The icons need to be 100×100 pixels and contain the titles of the books; beyond that, arrange ’em however you like. I’ll pick two recips out of everyone who sends me an icon — so if you want the book early, fire up your mouse!

Originally published at Swan Tower. You can comment here or there.

oursin: Sleeping hedgehog (sleepy hedgehog)
([personal profile] oursin Mar. 23rd, 2017 06:57 pm)

Meedja people wanted to film an interview with me in Former Place Of Work: this was supposed to happen next Monday, and ended up being today, this morning, before the facilities open to the public. (Greatly tempted to send The Famous Shirt on its own to do the job.) They did lay on a car to take me there. There was not a great deal of faffing about before we got to the, you know, actual interviewing.

This went fairly well, though I always suspect meedja luvvies to rave insincerely: this may be unfair.

I was fairly knackered after this, but yesterday I had an email from someone who wanted to discuss matters of mutual research interest, and was going to be visiting the Library today, so I said, could do coffee, or lunch, and we had a fairly intense and wide-ranging discussion of research over an extended lunch.

And when I got back to my desk, there was an enquiry from Another Meedja Person about a thing they're researching which is one that has (according to me) already been Done to Death, and they were very vague about what sort of angle they might be taking. But I thought I should at least get in a reply politely indicating that It's Been Done.

And then I came home, fully intending to rest for a bit and then go out again to the gym, but could not bring myself to leave the house again.

But at least I think I have done a fair amount of communicating Mi Learninz to people at various different levels today.

.

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