Fandoms I am considering nominating (click on tags to find what I've written about them before):

New to Yuletide:

George R. R. Martin's "Thousand Worlds" space opera stories.

Lois Duncan's psychic kids boarding school YA Down A Dark Hall.

John Woo's film Red Cliff.

Sarah Rees Brennan's Demon's Lexicon.

Vonda N. McIntyre's post-apocalyptic novel about healing, snakes, and biological engineering, Dreamsnake.

Nominated in previous years:

Peter O'Donnell's comic strip and novels about the woman in my icon, Modesty Blaise.

Anne McCaffrey's Pern.

Sherwood Smith's Inda series.

Ann Maxwell's space opera Fire Dancer.

Is anyone thinking of requesting any of these? What are you all thinking of nominating?
Fandoms I am considering nominating (click on tags to find what I've written about them before):

New to Yuletide:

George R. R. Martin's "Thousand Worlds" space opera stories.

Lois Duncan's psychic kids boarding school YA Down A Dark Hall.

John Woo's film Red Cliff.

Sarah Rees Brennan's Demon's Lexicon.

Vonda N. McIntyre's post-apocalyptic novel about healing, snakes, and biological engineering, Dreamsnake.

Nominated in previous years:

Peter O'Donnell's comic strip and novels about the woman in my icon, Modesty Blaise.

Anne McCaffrey's Pern.

Sherwood Smith's Inda series.

Ann Maxwell's space opera Fire Dancer.

Is anyone thinking of requesting any of these? What are you all thinking of nominating?
On [livejournal.com profile] liviapenn's suggestion, I am writing up a couple Yuletide-eligible fandoms which I recommend that people check out before Yuletide.

BATTLE OF RED CLIFF PART 1 & PART 2 ENGLISH SUBTITLES - 2 DVDS. Thrilling battles with extra-cool strategies, a sense of humor, Takeshi Kaneshiro and Tony Leung being extremely slashy at each other, and the chance to painlessly learn the Cliff Notes version of some important Chinese history and literature. What's not to love?

Dreamsnake, by Vonda N. McIntyre, is post-apocalyptic biological sf in which a doctor named Snake travels with her actual snakes, which have been genetically modified so that their bites can deliver medication. She encounters non-medical problems in the communities she meets as well, which she also tries to help with if she can. Very humane and compassionate, and the biology is pretty cool. If I request this, I'd be asking for the further or earlier adventures of Snake.

Tale Of The Five: The Sword And The Dragon. Diane Duane's perpetually unfinished (though luckily stand-alone) series begins with The Door Into Fire. In an intriguing world where polyamory and all other sorts of sexuality are totally cool with everyone, for generations only women have possessed the magic which enables great works and kills you young. But that's all beginning to change. Extremely sweet, with lots of companionship, adventure, banter, and love. Canonical gay, het, bi, lesbian, poly, and cross-species relationships.


Down a Dark Hall, a YA novel by Lois Duncan. This combines the genres of Gothic with "school for psychic kids," and so of course is a favorite of mine. Four teenage girls with special talents are trapped in a spooky boarding school run by a headmistress with an agenda. There's an obligatory hot young man (the headmistress' son) but really it's all about the relationships between the girls and how they cope with the situation.

Dreamsongs: Volume I and Dreamsongs: Volume II. Early in his career, George R R Martin wrote a bunch of lush, romantic, colorful space opera stories in a milieu called "The Thousand Worlds." They were full of weird planetscapes, vast distances, incomprehensible aliens, and an air of romantic tragedy and sense of wonder. If I ask for this, I'm looking for the setting and atmosphere; they all have different characters because they tend to conclude with the death, despair, or retirement of the protagonist, though there are exceptions.

Fire Dancer, by Ann Maxwell. The sequels are Dancer's Luck and Dancer's Illusion. Romantic space opera with cool aliens, including an adorably vain translating, shapeshifting snake, and a compelling romance. Rheba and Kirtn are the last survivors of their race -- or so they think! -- after their sun went nova. They are two races in a symbiotic relationship. Rheba is a humanoid dancer, which means she has psychic powers -- in her case, the control of "fire" (heat, electricity, etc.) Kirtn is a catlike humanoid, who can help Rheba control her powers. They are madly in love, but for complex reasons which, for once, actually make sense, they both think it's one-sided and are afraid to ask. Cue tons of adventure and smoldering (literally) glances.

Please comment or write your own post reccing small and eligible fandoms.
On [livejournal.com profile] liviapenn's suggestion, I am writing up a couple Yuletide-eligible fandoms which I recommend that people check out before Yuletide.

BATTLE OF RED CLIFF PART 1 & PART 2 ENGLISH SUBTITLES - 2 DVDS. Thrilling battles with extra-cool strategies, a sense of humor, Takeshi Kaneshiro and Tony Leung being extremely slashy at each other, and the chance to painlessly learn the Cliff Notes version of some important Chinese history and literature. What's not to love?

Dreamsnake, by Vonda N. McIntyre, is post-apocalyptic biological sf in which a doctor named Snake travels with her actual snakes, which have been genetically modified so that their bites can deliver medication. She encounters non-medical problems in the communities she meets as well, which she also tries to help with if she can. Very humane and compassionate, and the biology is pretty cool. If I request this, I'd be asking for the further or earlier adventures of Snake.

Tale Of The Five: The Sword And The Dragon. Diane Duane's perpetually unfinished (though luckily stand-alone) series begins with The Door Into Fire. In an intriguing world where polyamory and all other sorts of sexuality are totally cool with everyone, for generations only women have possessed the magic which enables great works and kills you young. But that's all beginning to change. Extremely sweet, with lots of companionship, adventure, banter, and love. Canonical gay, het, bi, lesbian, poly, and cross-species relationships.


Down a Dark Hall, a YA novel by Lois Duncan. This combines the genres of Gothic with "school for psychic kids," and so of course is a favorite of mine. Four teenage girls with special talents are trapped in a spooky boarding school run by a headmistress with an agenda. There's an obligatory hot young man (the headmistress' son) but really it's all about the relationships between the girls and how they cope with the situation.

Dreamsongs: Volume I and Dreamsongs: Volume II. Early in his career, George R R Martin wrote a bunch of lush, romantic, colorful space opera stories in a milieu called "The Thousand Worlds." They were full of weird planetscapes, vast distances, incomprehensible aliens, and an air of romantic tragedy and sense of wonder. If I ask for this, I'm looking for the setting and atmosphere; they all have different characters because they tend to conclude with the death, despair, or retirement of the protagonist, though there are exceptions.

Fire Dancer, by Ann Maxwell. The sequels are Dancer's Luck and Dancer's Illusion. Romantic space opera with cool aliens, including an adorably vain translating, shapeshifting snake, and a compelling romance. Rheba and Kirtn are the last survivors of their race -- or so they think! -- after their sun went nova. They are two races in a symbiotic relationship. Rheba is a humanoid dancer, which means she has psychic powers -- in her case, the control of "fire" (heat, electricity, etc.) Kirtn is a catlike humanoid, who can help Rheba control her powers. They are madly in love, but for complex reasons which, for once, actually make sense, they both think it's one-sided and are afraid to ask. Cue tons of adventure and smoldering (literally) glances.

Please comment or write your own post reccing small and eligible fandoms.
I've been meaning to do this for a while, ever since I noticed that a) Harlequin has been reissuing Georgette Heyer's entire backlist, and b) many Heyer fans do not read genre romance, so they haven't noticed.

There will be no mentions of Firebird on this list. We all know Firebird rocks. So does Starscape.

SPRIG MUSLIN, by Georgette Heyer.

And all her other books. (Be wary of a horrid anti-Semitic scene in the otherwise splendid THE GRAND SOPHY. In fact, I would skip ahead from when Sophy goes to visit the moneylender to when she leaves. All you need to know is that she gets what she wants from him.) But I'll use this as an example, because it's so utterly charming.

It's a two-couple Regency romance, but is really more of a comedy and parody of the entire romance genre, but particularly of the "spirited runaway girl" trope. The runaway girl is indeed spirited, but has absorbed the contents of far too many romance novels and taken them far too much to heart. Disasters ensue. The other heroine is practical and wears glasses. In my favorite scene, the spirited girl traps an aspiring playwright in a discussion of a play he ought to write about wicked Queen Katharine, which would include an on-stage autopsy with a tar-soaked sponge to represent her wicked black heart.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0373836244/qid=1092340592/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-3433239-3391102?v=glance&s=books

THE HOUSE OF THIRTY CATS, by Mary Calhoun

A children's book about a girl named Sarah who lives near an old cat woman's house. The local kids, who are a bit scared of her, will ring the doorbell if they want a kitten, and then run away when she gives them one. But when a mousy librarian gives Sarah George MacDonald's THE PRINCESS AND CURDIE, awakening Sarah to the wonders of fantasy-- and when Sarah later catches her reading a book on witchcraft-- she realizes that people may have hidden lives that are more surprising and wonderful than the personas they show to the world. When Sarah goes to get a kitten, she goes inside the house of thirty cats, and finds a world that's just as astonishing and beautiful as any fantasy. When town authorities try to shut down the house, Sarah decides to find homes for the cats by matching their personalities to those of the townspeople-- not their personas, but their true selves.

This is a lovely book, and an example of how much characterization of a large cast of human and cat characters can be packed into a few words.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0786816929/qid=1092341001/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-3433239-3391102?v=glance&s=books

HOTEL FOR DOGS, by Lois Duncan

Another children's book, this one by a writer who later became famous for YA suspense. (Of those books, I really like DOWN A DARK HALL and STRANGER WITH MY FACE.) Like CATS, it's a "secret garden" novel in which children create a private little world for themselves. A girl who is forced to leave her beloved dog behind when her family moves to Albuquerque, and in with an aunt who's allergic to dogs, hides a stray dog in the abandoned house next door. Then her brother hides a dog who ran away from its abusive owner. More and more kids who can't have pets of their own hide more and more dogs in the house, until matters come to a highly satisfying climax. Incidentally, the protagonist wants to be a writer, and her dedication and perseverance is a model for any as-yet-unpublished author.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0786816945/qid=1092341477/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-3433239-3391102?v=glance&s=books

More later...
I've been meaning to do this for a while, ever since I noticed that a) Harlequin has been reissuing Georgette Heyer's entire backlist, and b) many Heyer fans do not read genre romance, so they haven't noticed.

There will be no mentions of Firebird on this list. We all know Firebird rocks. So does Starscape.

SPRIG MUSLIN, by Georgette Heyer.

And all her other books. (Be wary of a horrid anti-Semitic scene in the otherwise splendid THE GRAND SOPHY. In fact, I would skip ahead from when Sophy goes to visit the moneylender to when she leaves. All you need to know is that she gets what she wants from him.) But I'll use this as an example, because it's so utterly charming.

It's a two-couple Regency romance, but is really more of a comedy and parody of the entire romance genre, but particularly of the "spirited runaway girl" trope. The runaway girl is indeed spirited, but has absorbed the contents of far too many romance novels and taken them far too much to heart. Disasters ensue. The other heroine is practical and wears glasses. In my favorite scene, the spirited girl traps an aspiring playwright in a discussion of a play he ought to write about wicked Queen Katharine, which would include an on-stage autopsy with a tar-soaked sponge to represent her wicked black heart.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0373836244/qid=1092340592/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-3433239-3391102?v=glance&s=books

THE HOUSE OF THIRTY CATS, by Mary Calhoun

A children's book about a girl named Sarah who lives near an old cat woman's house. The local kids, who are a bit scared of her, will ring the doorbell if they want a kitten, and then run away when she gives them one. But when a mousy librarian gives Sarah George MacDonald's THE PRINCESS AND CURDIE, awakening Sarah to the wonders of fantasy-- and when Sarah later catches her reading a book on witchcraft-- she realizes that people may have hidden lives that are more surprising and wonderful than the personas they show to the world. When Sarah goes to get a kitten, she goes inside the house of thirty cats, and finds a world that's just as astonishing and beautiful as any fantasy. When town authorities try to shut down the house, Sarah decides to find homes for the cats by matching their personalities to those of the townspeople-- not their personas, but their true selves.

This is a lovely book, and an example of how much characterization of a large cast of human and cat characters can be packed into a few words.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0786816929/qid=1092341001/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-3433239-3391102?v=glance&s=books

HOTEL FOR DOGS, by Lois Duncan

Another children's book, this one by a writer who later became famous for YA suspense. (Of those books, I really like DOWN A DARK HALL and STRANGER WITH MY FACE.) Like CATS, it's a "secret garden" novel in which children create a private little world for themselves. A girl who is forced to leave her beloved dog behind when her family moves to Albuquerque, and in with an aunt who's allergic to dogs, hides a stray dog in the abandoned house next door. Then her brother hides a dog who ran away from its abusive owner. More and more kids who can't have pets of their own hide more and more dogs in the house, until matters come to a highly satisfying climax. Incidentally, the protagonist wants to be a writer, and her dedication and perseverance is a model for any as-yet-unpublished author.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0786816945/qid=1092341477/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-3433239-3391102?v=glance&s=books

More later...
.

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