The extent to which I was unimpressed with this novel should not be taken as a reflection of its quality, but rather my utter burnout on light contemporary novels featuring vampires, were-creatures, witches, or elves.

I am still trying to figure out why I make an exception for the rather similar genre involving humans with super, psychic, or (non-witch) magic powers; my readers are welcome to comment. I still love Holly Black's novels; they are more in the realm of "intense and gritty with elves" than "chick lit with elves." Anyway, no more vampires or weres for me!

In a modern America where everyone knows weres and vampires exist, teen orphan Quincy Morris has a werewolf boyfriend. He could do with more personality. So could she. So could everyone. When her plan to open a vampire-themed restaurant with her uncle is foiled by the murder of the chef, they hire a hot young chef who is so obviously a vampire that, in this world where vampires exist, it makes all the characters seem like morons for taking 250 pages to figure this out. The restaurant details are good. I could have read a whole book about just that. But everything else bored me, and characters transforming into humorous animals like possums and armadillos is a joke that will never be funny to me.

The novel is quite readable, and has some twists at the end that would have been effectively dramatic and shocking if I'd cared about the characters. Seriously, if you're still into urban vampire and werewolf novels, this is actually a pretty decent recent sample of the genre.

Note: Yes, I have read Annette Curtis Klause, the Scribblies, Borderland, and John M. Ford. I like them. Yes, I have also read Sunshine and Sookie Stackhouse. I didn't like them.
The extent to which I was unimpressed with this novel should not be taken as a reflection of its quality, but rather my utter burnout on light contemporary novels featuring vampires, were-creatures, witches, or elves.

I am still trying to figure out why I make an exception for the rather similar genre involving humans with super, psychic, or (non-witch) magic powers; my readers are welcome to comment. I still love Holly Black's novels; they are more in the realm of "intense and gritty with elves" than "chick lit with elves." Anyway, no more vampires or weres for me!

In a modern America where everyone knows weres and vampires exist, teen orphan Quincy Morris has a werewolf boyfriend. He could do with more personality. So could she. So could everyone. When her plan to open a vampire-themed restaurant with her uncle is foiled by the murder of the chef, they hire a hot young chef who is so obviously a vampire that, in this world where vampires exist, it makes all the characters seem like morons for taking 250 pages to figure this out. The restaurant details are good. I could have read a whole book about just that. But everything else bored me, and characters transforming into humorous animals like possums and armadillos is a joke that will never be funny to me.

The novel is quite readable, and has some twists at the end that would have been effectively dramatic and shocking if I'd cared about the characters. Seriously, if you're still into urban vampire and werewolf novels, this is actually a pretty decent recent sample of the genre.

Note: Yes, I have read Annette Curtis Klause, the Scribblies, Borderland, and John M. Ford. I like them. Yes, I have also read Sunshine and Sookie Stackhouse. I didn't like them.
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