rachelmanija: (Autumn: small leaves)
( Jan. 1st, 2007 11:39 am)
My original Yuletide assignment was The Taste of Honey for Neil Gaiman’s brilliant and beautiful comic book series Sandman. It’s rated G.

You do not need to know the series to read the story, nor does it spoil anything; but if you’re not familiar with the series, read the paragraph below before reading the story.

Sandman is considered a classic for very good reasons. It’s about Dream, also known as Morpheus, or Sandman, or Lord Shaper, or by many other names. He is the lord and embodiment of dreams, both the literal kind and creative inspiration, and of stories and storytelling. Like his siblings, he appears differently to different people: a dreaming cat sees him as (majestic) cat. And it is the story of his sister Death, who takes her job very seriously and life very lightly, by which I mean, very seriously indeed. And the stories of his other siblings: Destiny, Desire and Despair (who are twins), Destruction (who abandoned his post), and Delirium, who once was Delight. And many others, Gods and mortals, angels and demons, werewolves and witches and pumpkinheads; and everyone who dreams.

I generally recommend beginning with the fourth volume, Dream Country, a collection of stand-alone stories. The first volume, Preludes and Nocturnes, can be skipped; it’s not the same tone as the rest of the series. The second, A Doll’s House, is again a little wobbly, but begins with a lovely story about Dream accompanying Death on an ordinary day on the job, “The Sound of Her Wings.”

Please read my story, if you’re going to read it, before clicking on the cut. It definitely benefits by not being spoiled for it before you read it.

spoilers )
rachelmanija: (Autumn: small leaves)
( Jan. 1st, 2007 11:39 am)
My original Yuletide assignment was The Taste of Honey for Neil Gaiman’s brilliant and beautiful comic book series Sandman. It’s rated G.

You do not need to know the series to read the story, nor does it spoil anything; but if you’re not familiar with the series, read the paragraph below before reading the story.

Sandman is considered a classic for very good reasons. It’s about Dream, also known as Morpheus, or Sandman, or Lord Shaper, or by many other names. He is the lord and embodiment of dreams, both the literal kind and creative inspiration, and of stories and storytelling. Like his siblings, he appears differently to different people: a dreaming cat sees him as (majestic) cat. And it is the story of his sister Death, who takes her job very seriously and life very lightly, by which I mean, very seriously indeed. And the stories of his other siblings: Destiny, Desire and Despair (who are twins), Destruction (who abandoned his post), and Delirium, who once was Delight. And many others, Gods and mortals, angels and demons, werewolves and witches and pumpkinheads; and everyone who dreams.

I generally recommend beginning with the fourth volume, Dream Country, a collection of stand-alone stories. The first volume, Preludes and Nocturnes, can be skipped; it’s not the same tone as the rest of the series. The second, A Doll’s House, is again a little wobbly, but begins with a lovely story about Dream accompanying Death on an ordinary day on the job, “The Sound of Her Wings.”

Please read my story, if you’re going to read it, before clicking on the cut. It definitely benefits by not being spoiled for it before you read it.

spoilers )
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