This is probably one of my top ten favorite manga series, and the only one in my top ten that was originally written in English.

It's a perfect blend of manga and indie comic style and sensibility-- manga ranging from Naruto to Nana, the films of Richard Linklater, garage bands, and role-playing games all seem to be influences. The dialogue is so hilarious that I would quote some, except that when I flipped through to find a good example, I realized that although virtually every page has some quotable line or exchange, all of them are so grounded in the plot and character relationships that they would require paragraphs of explanation. And despite its frequent breaking of the fourth wall and the total insanity of the plot, the characters all seem very real, and the story has a lot of heart.

Scott Pilgrim is a Canadian slacker sharing an apartment (and bed, but in a totally platonic way) with his cool gay roommate Wallace Wells. ("Hey, what's up? This is my cool gay roommate, Wallace Wells.") Scott is dating a high school girl, Knives Chau. His friends do not approve. ("You should break up with your fake high school girlfriend, Scott.") But Knives is sweet and sincere, and she even loves Scott's band that probably kind of sucks, Sex Bob-omb. But then Scott meets a woman his own age: Ramona Flowers, an Amazon.ca deliveryperson who roller-blades through a sub-space highway that goes through Scott's head, so she shows up in his dreams. Naturally, he gets obsessed with her. But in order to date Ramona, Scott must first defeat her seven evil ex-boyfriends.

Luckily, Scott is the best fighter in the province. Unluckily, he has yet to get up the nerve to break up with Knives Chau...

Scott Pilgrim has such a unique sensibility that I flounder trying to explain how much I love it. The characters all seem like real people I might meet someday, or maybe used to know back in college, except that some of them happen to have super ninja powers. The bands that suck, the artists you can't help loving even when you meet them and they are absolute jerks to you, the roommates who are probably quietly taking over the world behind your back, the baggage of past relationships, and the little pizza places around the corner all seem absolutely real-- and so does the way that Scott's opponents can blow two holes in the moon, or suddenly materialize a line of Bollywood dancers at climactic moments. The characters are all aware that at times they are living in a comic book or video game, but that doesn't make the pain of getting dumped hurt any less. And the art is very expressive and funny-- the character designs are simple, but the emotions you read in their faces are vivid and clear.

It's great. Go read it.
This is probably one of my top ten favorite manga series, and the only one in my top ten that was originally written in English.

It's a perfect blend of manga and indie comic style and sensibility-- manga ranging from Naruto to Nana, the films of Richard Linklater, garage bands, and role-playing games all seem to be influences. The dialogue is so hilarious that I would quote some, except that when I flipped through to find a good example, I realized that although virtually every page has some quotable line or exchange, all of them are so grounded in the plot and character relationships that they would require paragraphs of explanation. And despite its frequent breaking of the fourth wall and the total insanity of the plot, the characters all seem very real, and the story has a lot of heart.

Scott Pilgrim is a Canadian slacker sharing an apartment (and bed, but in a totally platonic way) with his cool gay roommate Wallace Wells. ("Hey, what's up? This is my cool gay roommate, Wallace Wells.") Scott is dating a high school girl, Knives Chau. His friends do not approve. ("You should break up with your fake high school girlfriend, Scott.") But Knives is sweet and sincere, and she even loves Scott's band that probably kind of sucks, Sex Bob-omb. But then Scott meets a woman his own age: Ramona Flowers, an Amazon.ca deliveryperson who roller-blades through a sub-space highway that goes through Scott's head, so she shows up in his dreams. Naturally, he gets obsessed with her. But in order to date Ramona, Scott must first defeat her seven evil ex-boyfriends.

Luckily, Scott is the best fighter in the province. Unluckily, he has yet to get up the nerve to break up with Knives Chau...

Scott Pilgrim has such a unique sensibility that I flounder trying to explain how much I love it. The characters all seem like real people I might meet someday, or maybe used to know back in college, except that some of them happen to have super ninja powers. The bands that suck, the artists you can't help loving even when you meet them and they are absolute jerks to you, the roommates who are probably quietly taking over the world behind your back, the baggage of past relationships, and the little pizza places around the corner all seem absolutely real-- and so does the way that Scott's opponents can blow two holes in the moon, or suddenly materialize a line of Bollywood dancers at climactic moments. The characters are all aware that at times they are living in a comic book or video game, but that doesn't make the pain of getting dumped hurt any less. And the art is very expressive and funny-- the character designs are simple, but the emotions you read in their faces are vivid and clear.

It's great. Go read it.
.

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